first_imgThe Deputy Minister-Designate of the Ministry of Health, Dr. Francis Nah Kateh, has urged laboratory technicians in Liberia to help make a difference in the profession.Speaking on Wednesday at a Lab Week Conference held at the Monrovia City Hall, Dr. Kateh told lab technicians that their roles in building a resilient health system in the country is critical and must involve research.“We want to urge you to use Face Book for learning, focusing particularly your weaknesses and not your successes. Use Face Book  to correct the little things that you forget about and be able to make progress,” he stressed.According to him, efforts by technicians and other health workers would help in supporting the government and its partners in building a resilient health system for Liberia, considering the impact of the deadly Ebola virus in the lives of the people and on the country at large.“You cannot have a clinic, or hospital if we don’t have lab technicians to provide the necessary lab results for treatment. This is one of the reasons that make your area very important.”  He further said that as a clinician, it is important to have the right equipment in order to produce the right diagnoses to treat patients.Dr. Kateh noted that without continued education in such a critical area as health, lab technicians stand to forget some of the basic things that are cardinal to  providing better services  to patients. “A simple information error by a clinician can create untold consequences,” he warned, noting that it is important for lab  technicians always to be on top of their profession.  Dr. Karteh is also Chief Medical Officer at the Jackson F. Doe Hospital in Tappita, Nimba County.Contributing, Dr. Patrick Kpanyen called on the government and its partners to invest in research, particularly in laboratory technicians to get a functional sector to benefit patients.According to him, investing in this field would support a better health system benefitting to the people, adding that the human capacity must be seen as one of the best ways to build the country’s health system.“We need to invest in lab research,  especially in lab diagnostics education,” he suggested. Many of these people have the potential and we need also to help them  graduate from certificate to diploma and beyond, in order to enable them to realize their dreams.”   Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgHave you ever stared at a map on your phone, utterly confused, as your GPS cryptically directed you to “head east”? It turns out that the entorhinal region of the brain—an area best known for its role in memory formation—may be at least partly to blame for your poor sense of direction. According to a study published online today in Current Biology, this brain region may help humans decide which direction to go to reach a destination. To traverse any environment, a navigator has to have a sense of both the direction they’re currently facing and the direction to the destination. In the study, participants explored a virtual, square room with four unique objects in each corner and different landscapes on each of the four walls. Once they were familiar with the environment, the volunteers had to navigate a series of paths from one corner to another while the researchers monitored their brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging. The entorhinal region has long been known to help people identify which direction they’re facing already, but to plan a route, navigators must also imagine the direction of their destination. The study showed that this brain region likely also has a role in decisions about which directions to face next to get where we want to go. And as the participants imagined their way through the virtual room, the researchers found that the strength of the signal from this region was directly related to navigational performance, providing some new insights into why some people never need to stop for directions and others can’t even navigate their way out of a parking garage.last_img read more