first_imgA drive for good nutrition among pregnant women and children in a southern Assam district has been given a gooseberry candy twist. This follows a report that the targeted groups find the prescribed iron-folic acid tablets repulsive.According to the 2015 National Family Health Survey, 47.2% of the women of reproductive age in Hailakandi were anaemic. The district, thus, has the most anaemic children below 5 years, adolescents and women of reproductive age in Assam.But mothers, pregnant women and children in the district, data reveal, consume only 24.3% of the total iron-folic acid tablets that the district receives and distributes. “The tablets given to these groups are often not consumed as they feel nauseated or have constipation issues. There are also myths that these tablets will kill them or make them incapable of conceiving,” District Deputy Commissioner Keerthi Jalli told The Hindu. Amla, jaggery comboTo get around the problem while launching Poshan Maah, or nutrition month, a few days ago, the district administration decided to produce roundish amla-gur candies with a dose of salt. Nutritionists involved in the campaign said amla, or gooseberry, is rich in Vitamin C and antioxidants, while gur, or jaggery, is rich in iron, vital vitamins and minerals that boost the immune system.“The gooseberry candy is a home-made recipe, and is provided alongside iron-folic acid tablets as behavioural change in nutritious eating is a slow process. If women and children avoid the tablet, they can get the required vitamin and mineral inputs through the improvised delicacy of which ingredients are available locally,” Ms. Jalli said. The candy is cost-effective too, she said. Anganwadi workers, supervisors and mothers have been engaged to prepare and distribute the ‘laddoos’ with the ingredients given by the district authorities.“This is a novel initiative that should go a long way in checking anaemia that increases the risk during pregnancy and at childbirth, besides resulting in low birth weight and malnourished children,” Anganwadi worker Labiba Begum Barlaskar said.About 32.5% of the children aged below five in Hailakandi are underweight. The average figure for Assam is 30%.last_img read more

first_img Children, adolescents and youth need a continuum of age-appropriate information on health, well-being, gender, relationships, sexuality and reproductive health to guide their decisions going into adulthood.This is one of the findings of research conducted on adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ASRH) that was presented at the eighth staging of the National Health Research Conference in Kingston in November 2017.Speaking at a recent JIS ‘Think Tank’, Researcher, Dr. Pauline Russell-Brown, of PEY and Associates, shared some of the findings and recommendations of the study and stressed the importance of research on the subject area.“Meeting the ASRH needs of adolescents is key, and evidence of the long-term effectiveness of such programmes is needed to guide current ASRH programming,” she said.Dr. Russell-Brown explained that for this particular study, the team followed up with former students (now adults) who had been exposed to an intervention associated with the Health and Family Life Education (HFLE) programme while in primary school.The intervention sought to bring out the Smart, Togetherness, Attitude Positive, Respectful and Ready (STAR) in young adolescents in the early 2000s.“The theory of the intervention was that if young adolescents learn to value themselves and are connected to supportive significant persons at home, school and within their community, they will make choices that will positively influence their life’s outcomes,” she said.The research, which was carried out as a part of the USAID-funded Youth.now project, was implemented in Askenish and Cave Valley Primary Schools in Hanover. The package included teacher training, ongoing support from a consultant, materials, parent education and community outreach.“We interviewed the participants along with teachers, guidance counsellors and parents more than a decade later to ascertain their trajectory into adulthood as they initiated their reproductive lives, and to assess the effect, if any, of the intervention they received as young adolescents,” Dr. Russell-Brown explained.The young adults who had been exposed to the programme remembered it well, particularly the interaction they had and support received from their guidance counsellors. According to the research, many of the young adults who had been exposed to specific elements of the project as children were now in stable relationships, and the young women who bore children had them at an older age than their counterparts who had not been exposed.At the time of the intervention, short-term benefits were found related to parent-child communication, teacher understanding of adolescent development, increase in related school activities and community involvement.The teachers and guidance counsellors involved in the intervention have indicated that although it ended years ago, they still use the techniques they learned about being more interactive to bring out the creativity in students. It was recommended that consideration be given to implementing the programme in all schools, starting as early as kindergarten. Speaking at a recent JIS ‘Think Tank’, Researcher, Dr. Pauline Russell-Brown, of PEY and Associates, shared some of the findings and recommendations of the study and stressed the importance of research on the subject area. Children, adolescents and youth need a continuum of age-appropriate information on health, well-being, gender, relationships, sexuality and reproductive health to guide their decisions going into adulthood. Story Highlights Dr. Russell-Brown explained that for this particular study, the team followed up with former students (now adults) who had been exposed to an intervention associated with the Health and Family Life Education (HFLE) programme while in primary school.last_img read more

first_imgPARIS — The central French city of Bourges is shuttering shops to brace for possible violence between police and yellow vest protesters, as the nationwide movement seeks a new stage for its weekly demonstrations.Paris, too, is hunkering down for a ninth weekend of anti-government protests Saturday. France’s government has deployed 80,000 security forces for the day, and Interior Minister Christophe Castaner threatened tough retaliation against violence.Online groups mounted calls through the week for mass protests in Bourges, but Paris police said they wouldn’t let down their guard, notably around government buildings and the Champs-Elysees, scene of repeated rioting in past protests.The protest movement waned over the holidays but appears to be resurging, despite concessions by President Emmanuel Macron. Protesters want deeper changes to France’s economy and politics.The Associated Presslast_img read more

first_imgVICTORIA, B.C. — Citizens’ Services Minister Jinny Sims announced yesterday that the provincial government will contribute $7 million for Shaw Communications to build a fibre-optic cable along the Hart Highway between Prince George and Dawson Creek.The fibre optic line that will be built from the Northern Cariboo to the Peace Region will be just over 400 kilometres in length, and is one of four connectivity projects being funded by the B.C. government. Shaw has had issues serving the Peace Region in the past, and yesterday’s announcement came just one day after an issue with a fibre line caused Shaw customers in Fort St. John, Taylor, and Dawson Creek to experience a service interruption. Last year, Shaw customers in the Peace experienced three separate outages due to issues with the company’s network.On Tuesday, Sims announced that the Province and Feds are both partnering with internet service providers on $38 million worth of Internet infrastructure across B.C., with the provincial government contributing $11.3 million in total. “This is not just an investment in high-speed internet, it’s an investment in the future for those living in rural, First Nations and Indigenous communities, so they have access to cutting-edge emergency services, high-quality health care, world-class education and improved ability to participate in the growing digital economy,” said Sims. “By working with our federal and local partners, we are leveraging relationships to give people in these communities the same internet access as those living in major urban centres.”The announcement was part of an event hosted by Canada’s Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Navdeep Bains, as the federal government committed a further $19,748,063 to the four projects.“Access to high-speed internet is not a luxury, it’s essential,” said Bains. “High-speed internet service is a basic tool that all Canadians should have access to, regardless of their postal code. Canadians need this service to do business, upgrade their education and build stronger communities. Thanks to our Connect to Innovate program, more Canadians will be able to participate fully in the digital economy.”last_img read more

first_imgThe Canadian Press VANCOUVER — Four oil and gas companies are expected to answer questions today about how they use the Trans Mountain pipeline, how refinery closures affect their prices and other factors that could contribute to British Columbia’s volatile prices at the pump.A three-member panel, chaired by B.C. Utilities Commission CEO David Morton, will listen to up to four days of oral hearings in Vancouver as part of a public inquiry into the high price of gasoline and diesel in the province.Parkland Fuels, Shell, Imperial Oil and Suncor are scheduled to give opening remarks and answer questions from the panel this afternoon. In the morning, those firms and other interveners will have an opportunity to question Deetken Group, a consulting firm that prepared a report for the inquiry identifying possible reasons for the fuel price spikes.Deetken found land values and credit card fees have likely contributed to higher retail margins, while transportation and regulatory costs could be part of the reason wholesale gasoline margins are higher in British Columbia but they don’t tell the whole story.Premier John Horgan called the public inquiry in May as gasoline prices at the pump reached a record-breaking $1.70 per litre.At the time, the B.C. Liberals and Alberta government bought advertising blaming Horgan and linking his government’s resistance to the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion for the surging costs.The National Energy Board will also appear before the panel.The inquiry will conclude with a final report by the panel due Aug. 30.last_img read more

first_imgCHETWYND, B.C. – RCMP responded to a Motor Vehicle Crash East of Chetwynd on Hwy 97 S. On Friday, October 4th, 2019 at 5:05 AM.According to the RCMP, when the police arrived, the driver of the vehicle had left the scene. After a thorough investigation police discover that the vehicle involved had been reported stolen out of Mackenzie BC.With help from members of the community, Chetwynd RCMP was able to track down the driver of the vehicle. The driver, who is well known to police, is a prolific offender from Prince George, the Peace Laird Area and into Alberta. The suspect remains in police custody, pending a future court date and could face charges of Possession of Stolen Property, Possession of Break and Enter Tools, and leaving the scene of an accident.The investigation is ongoing and police ask anyone with information on this matter to call the Chetwynd RCMP at 250 778 9221 or Crime Stoppers at 1 800 222-8477last_img read more

first_imgNew Delhi: The central government has approved a five-fold increase in one-time incentive given to its employees who acquire higher degrees while serving in their departments, officials said Monday.The amount of incentive will be increased from a minimum of Rs 10,000 to a maximum of Rs 30,000 for acquiring higher qualifications like Ph.D, they said. The Personnel Ministry has amended a 20-year-old norm in this regard to increase the amount of incentives provided for the employees. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’The government employees acquiring fresh higher qualifications after coming into service were granted incentive in the form of one-time lump-sum amount ranging from Rs 2,000 to Rs 10,000. Now, it has been decided to increase the amount to a minimum of Rs 10,000 to a maximum of Rs 30,000, an order recently issued by the Personnel Ministry stated. While Rs 10,000 will be given for acquiring degree/diploma of duration of three years or less, Rs 15,000 will be given for acquiring degree/diploma having duration of more than three years, it said. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KA sum of Rs 20,000 will be given for earning post graduate degree/diploma with one year or less. Such qualification having duration of more than one year will get Rs 25,000 to the employees, the new order stated. A highest incentive of Rs 30,000 will be given to those getting Ph.D or equivalent, it stated. There are around 48.41 lakh central government employees. “No incentive shall be allowed for acquiring higher qualification purely on academic or literary subjects,” it clarified. The acquisition of the qualification should be directly related to the functions of the post held by him/her, or to the functions to be performed in the next higher post, the ministry said. “There should be direct nexus between the functions of the post and the qualification acquired and that it should contribute to the efficiency of the government servant,” it said. The incentive, however, shall not be admissible where the employee is sponsored by the government or he/she avails study leave for acquiring the qualification, the order stated. “The incentive would be given only for higher qualification acquired after induction into service,” it stated. Further, the incentive shall be limited to maximum two times in an employee’s career, with a minimum gap of two years between successive grants, the ministry said. According to Personnel Ministry’s order issued in April 1999, employees were entitled for a minimum of Rs 2,000 and maximum of Rs 10,000 for getting fresh qualifications. While Rs 2,000 was applicable incentive for “passing intermediate examination”, those earning post graduate degree of Ph.D were entitled for a maximum of Rs 10,000.last_img read more

first_imgBadaun (UP): Giving her own twist to a recent remark by Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath, BSP chief Mayawati Saturday said her party wanted both Ali and Bajrang Bali — particularly Bajrang Bali as the deity is “linked with my own Dalit caste”.Addressing a rally in Badaun, Mayawati recalled Adityanath’s comment on Tuesday in which he referred to her earlier appeal to Muslims to vote for the opposition alliance in Uttar Pradesh. “In this connection, I want to tell him (Adityanath) that both Ali and Bajrang Bali Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’are ours…. So we want both Ali as well as Bajrang Bali,” she said. Adityanath had said if Ali was with the BSP-SP-RLD combine, Bajrang Bali was with the BJP. Ali is a revered figure in Islam and Lord Hanuman is often called Bajrang Bali. Both Mayawati and Adityanath were served notices by the Election Commission over their remarks. “We particularly want Bajrang Bali because he is linked to my own Dalit caste,” Mayawati said. The BSP chief was apparently referring to Adityanath’s comments last year when he had described Lord Hanuman as a forest dweller and a Dalit. “I am very thankful to Yogi-ji that he has given us important information about our ancestors. So, it is a very happy moment to note that we have both Ali and Bajrang Bali and their coming together will give us very good results in these elections,” she said.last_img read more

first_imgThe deadliest cyclone to affect India in recent times was two decades ago which hit Orissa’s capital city Bhubaneswar with a wind speed of over 250 kmph on October 29, 1999. The mighty cyclone caused a storm surge of up to 8 meters onto the coast and torrential rains that followed leading to extensive flooding, killing around 9,658 people. And here’s Fani — the strongest storm in India in two decades, which has hit Odisha on Friday morning and has started making its impact felt. Strong winds swept through Bhubaneswar and the temple town of Puri which also witnessed heavy rain. In the past 30 years, only four extremely severe cyclonic storms have made landfall on Odisha and the Bengal coast. If Fani maintains the intensity as has been predicted by the IMD, it might be the fifth. The cyclone might turn out to be the strongest to hit the eastern coast since ‘Hudhud’ that made landfall on the east coast near Visakhapatnam in Andhra Pradesh killing around 100 people and causing damage worth 21,000 crores to that state alone. So, how is the preparedness to combat Fani? The cyclone is being continuously monitored ever since it developed near Sri Lanka and repeated warnings have been issued for the past one week. After every few hours, alerts have been issued for the fishermen and people living in coastal regions and massive emergency preparedness has been put in place. Odisha government has moved over 11 lakh people, including at least 542 pregnant women, to safety in the last 24 hours and advised the public to remain indoors. More than three lakh people have been evacuated from Ganjam district alone and 1.3 lakh from Puri. About 5,000 kitchens are operating to serve people in shelters. Relief commissioners and District Collectors are leading the operations on the ground. Trucks are ready with relief material, including essential supplies such as food, drinking water and medicines. Chief Minister of Odisha Naveen Patnaik is personally monitoring the situation. Trains and flights have been cancelled. Around 900 cyclone shelters have been set up in Odisha to house the evacuees. Adequate preparations to ensure the maintenance of essential services such as power, telecommunications in the event of damages have also been made. Railways, Civil Aviation and Shipping Ministries have been advised to review their preparedness well in time and ensure the quick resumption of their services in the event of any disruption. The Indian Coast Guard and the Navy have deployed ships and helicopters for relief and rescue operations. Army and Air Force units in the three states have also been put on stand-by. Nevertheless, Fani is strong because of the route it has adopted and has been termed as an “extremely severe cyclone”. Fani originated very close to the Equator and has spent a lot of time over the sea that has helped it to gather more moist air from the warm sea which has added to its heft. Over the years, India has learnt to prepare well for such calamities. Especially after ‘Phailin’ that swept through Odisha in 2013, the then head of the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction lauded the state’s efforts and called it a “landmark success.” Just hope this ‘Fani’ (pronounced as ‘Foni’) as the name has been suggested by Bangladesh which roughly means the hood of a snake, is just not too powerful to trample the spirit of those millions who have woken up to the impending calamity today.last_img read more

first_imgHere are the rest of this week’s people on the move…Eric SundermannThe Fader tapped Eric Sundermann as its first head of content this week. He joins the magazine from Vice’s music media site, Noisey, where he served as its editor-in-chief and in his new role, he will be tasked with overseeing content from all extension of The Fader, including its print, digital, social and events platforms. Sundermann will report to publisher and president Andy Cohn.Longtime Time magazine editor Michael Duffy left the magazine after over three decades to join the Washington Post, where he is taking over as acting deputy editorial page editor for Ruth Marcus, who is on book leave for the next year. Duffy most recently served as a contributing editor for Time, but has held several other positions at the title including deputy managing editor, nation editor, Washington bureau chief and editorial director of Time Inc.Editor-in-chief of The Week Ben Frumin is joining The New York Times’ product review website Wirecutter as its new EIC. In his new role, which he begins on Jan. 7, Frumin will be tasked with overseeing all of the brand’s coverage as well as leading day-to-day editorial operations. He has been with TheWeek.com since 2011, when he joined as its deputy editor before being promoted to his current role as EIC in 2012. Sarah LaskowThe Atlantic made two recent editorial appointments, including hiring Sarah Laskow as its new senior editor on the Science-Technology-Health desk, who will be tasked with running the science team starting on Dec. 17. Laskow most recently was with Atlas Obscura, where she served as a senior writer covering the science space, and prior to that, was with Smithsonian Magazine, Center for Public Integrity and NPR. And Elaina Plott, who joined The Atlantic in January of this year as a staff writer, was promoted to the role of White House correspondent. Most recently, Plott had been focusing on covering national politics with an emphasis on Congress.David Myron was tapped as the editor-in-chief of ProSales, Hanley Wood’s lumber and building materials channel. He joins the magazine from research and advisory firm Gartner where he served as the director of event program management, and before that, he was with Information Today, CRM Magazine and Speech Tech Magazine.  In his new role, Myron will be tasked with leading the magazine’s editorial direction, digital coverage plans, daily execution, and ongoing executive in-person training programming on Hanley Wood’s ProSales, the ProSales 100 Business Conference, and a portfolio of digital products. He will report to VP and editorial director for the Residential Group John McManus.Ava LubellQuartz appointed its first general counsel and director of corporate operations this week. Ava Lubell is joining the company from Slate where she had served as its general manager and general counsel, overseeing all legal work and day-to-day operations of the business. In Lubell’s new role, which is aimed at establishing standalone corporate operations for the company following its separation from Atlantic Media this past summer, she will be tasked with directing Quartz’s legal strategy, as well as overseeing the legal, facilities, IT, and human resources functions. Starting on Dec. 17, she will report to CFO Tomoyuki Ota from the New York City headquarters and will work closely with Ota to build out that staff.Christopher Rosen, who most recently served as the editorial director at Entercom, started as the editor-in-chief of TVGuide.com this week. Prior to his stint at the radio company, Rosen held the role of executive editor at Entertainment Weekly.The Washington Examiner Magazine appointed Jay Caruso and Grant Addison as deputy editors this week. Caruso, who is joining the publication from the Dallas Morning News, where he served as an editorial writer, starts his new role on Dec. 24, and Addison, who most recently served as the program manager for education policy at the American Enterprise Institute, starts on Dec. 7.Priscilla Alvarez is leaving her post as a politics editor and writer for The Atlantic to join CNN Politics as a reporter covering immigration policy and politicsJ.J. Gould announced that he leaving The New Republic, according to Politico’s Morning Media Newsletter, after just over a year with the publication, following a month-long leave. Gould, who most recently served as TNR’s editor, and briefly filled in as its acting president following publisher Hamilton Fish V’s leave of absence in the wake of sexual harassment allegations, joined the brand in Sept. 2017, and prior to that, was at The Atlantic for over seven years where he led its website. According to Michael Calderone for Politico, Gould said that he “resigned amicably,” and that he is “pursuing something else.” The New Republic reporter Nihal Krishan was selected as a Ben Bagdikian reporting fellow for Mother Jones starting this month.Former writer and editor for Foreign Policy, Defense One, and HuffPost, Molly O’Toole is joining the Los Angeles Times as an immigration writer based in Washington, D.C. Politico Pro’s Caitlin Emma is shifting from the education team to the budget and appropriations team. Anita Kumar is joining Politico next month as a White House correspondent and associate editor from McClatchy, where she covered the White House since 2012. And Politico technology reporter Ashley Gold is joining The Information as a reporter in the organization’s new Washington, D.C. bureau. Dirk StandenDirk Standen, editor-in-chief of Condé Nast’s in-house branding agency, 23 Stories—which was relaunched as CNX last month—is leaving the company, according to a report by Business of Fashion. His exit follows shortly behind the recent appointment of John Deschner as managing director of the CNX division, as well as last week’s announcement that CEO Bob Sauerberg was leaving in an effort to further integrate the U.S. and International divisions of the company and lean further into a digital-first strategy. Standen had been with Condé for 15 years, starting as the deputy editor of the digital division, before spending a decade as the editor-in-chief of Style.com until 2015, when he briefly served as digital creative director at W Magazine before taking on his most recent role. As the founding editor of 23 Stories, Standen helped to establish a major revenue source for the company. “Being the editor-in-chief of Style.com and working with such a talented group of people was the thrill of a lifetime,” said Standen in a statement shared with BOF. “Then as founding editor of 23 Stories, I got to work with many leading advertisers and help build a creative agency that quickly became one of the most successful divisions in the company. I’m looking forward to combining those experiences in my next adventure.”last_img read more