first_imgHouston Rockets’ Chris Paul, right, steps over Golden State Warriors’ Stephen Curry (30) after losing the ball out of bounds during the first quarter of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Houston guard Chris Paul is out for the Rockets’ game in Sacramento on Wednesday night because of a bruised left knee and coach Mike D’Antoni isn’t counting on him Saturday for the home opener against Dallas.“It’s not a concern, it’s just nagging,” D’Antoni said before the game against the Kings. “We’ll sit him until the training staff thinks he’s ready to go and try to get over it totally.”ADVERTISEMENT View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong Citycenter_img Kin of Misamis Oriental hero cop to get death benefits, award — PNP Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Tuesday’s game was the first since March 9, 2015, that Paul was held to four or fewer points.D’Antoni isn’t concerned about Paul falling behind integrating and getting comfortable alongside JamesHarden in one of the Western Conference’s newest backcourt dynamic duos.“I don’t think it’s a challenge, you’ve got two great players that play very well on the ball and off the ball,” D’Antoni said. “I don’t see a problem. He wasn’t healthy yesterday so he was going half speed and we’re playing Golden State, so that was the challenge yesterday. They’ve looked good in practice. I think they’ll keep figuring things out a little bit better and make it easier on each other. But we’re looking forward to just getting him back healthy.”ADVERTISEMENT Hayward from hospital: It’s hurting me that I can’t be there Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Eric Gordon was to start in place of Paul, who still could be ready by Saturday but D’Antoni said, “I think he’s still in play but I think it’s hard.”Paul had four points and shot 2 for 9 in the Rockets’ season-opening 122-121 win at Golden State on Tuesday night but was limited by soreness in the knee. He led the Rockets with 11 assists and also grabbed eight rebounds, while playing 33 minutes in his regular-season debut with Houston after being traded away by the Los Angeles Clippers during the offseason.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“Man, I got through it,” Paul told reporters after the game in Oakland. “It was cool. Tough game, but it’s all about getting the win.”Paul was hampered at the end of the preseason by the knee pain which continued flaring Tuesday, and D’Antoni said the perennial All-Star “is playing on one leg right now.” LATEST STORIES Read Nextlast_img read more

first_imgJaipur Pink Panthers and U Mumba players in action during the final of the Pro Kabaddi league in Mumbai.As Jaipur Pink Panthers’ captain Niketan Gautam stepped into the ballroom of the after-party hosted by promoter Anand Mahindra in honour of the Pro Kabaddi League winners (PKL) at the Four Seasons’,Jaipur Pink Panthers and U Mumba players in action during the final of the Pro Kabaddi league in Mumbai.As Jaipur Pink Panthers’ captain Niketan Gautam stepped into the ballroom of the after-party hosted by promoter Anand Mahindra in honour of the Pro Kabaddi League winners (PKL) at the Four Seasons’ Hotel, Mumbai, he could not help but break into a dance with his trophy. He hugged people with it, grabbed hors d’oeuvres with it, shook hands of corporate honchos, air-kissed socialites with it, and headed to the dance floor with it.His teammates, stylishly attired in pink and blue and gathered around star player Mani, aka Maninder Singh, followed suit, awkwardly spreading out in a space they were clearly not used to. Jasvir Singh, sledger par excellence on field, grinned nervously. As the runners-up, U Mumba, shyly filed in, ushers pushed them out away from entering via the dining area and through the main hall, where they downed their drinks too quickly, and stuck to the sides of the halls. Rajesh Narwal, 24, the raider from Ridhana in Haryana, bent to touch the feet of team owner Ronnie Screwvala and his wife Zarine Mehta as they entered. By 1 a.m., a busload of Puneri Paltans joined in, and by 3 a.m., the Patna Pirates were tearing each others’ shirts off. At the first afterparty of the first PKL season, coveted by corporate well-heeled, the boys from baulk lines, its stars, were finally cool.And it’s taking some getting used to. Rahul Choudhari, star raider for the Telugu Titans, and one of the most stylish players in the league, has been overwhelmed. “I am not able to sit, in a bus, on a flight, without people coming up to me,” he says. At 26, he is watching his mother being inundated with marriage proposals. But more than anything else, where some 70 clubs played kabaddi in his hometown of Bijnor in Uttar Pradesh, he says, over 250 have mushroomed. The story repeats, from Patna Pirates captain Rakesh Kumar, who is from Nizampur in Delhi, to Anup Kumar, who is from Palra in Haryana and leads U Mumba. Where the IPL had 453 million viewers in the first 15 days, and the FIFA World Cup attracted 129 million viewers, Star Sports says the PKL hit 288 million viewers.advertisementIt’s what founder PKL promoters and brothers-in-law Charu Sharma and Mahindra call “bringing kabaddi out of the shadows and into the sunlight”. Sharma, leaning excitedly into every stand in the finals, accedes his sun is now shining brightly indeed. They’ve just announced a women’s league and a World Cup. He says as a franchise they kept expenses low and generated revenues reasonable enough to allow them to dream of breaking even. At the start of the season, Sharma kept telling team owners not to sell to people who would make them wait two days in their offices. Today, he says, they are welcomed, but no one is selling. There is faith that profitability will come.The myth that kabaddi is a rural sport is broken. The 415 professional kabaddi clubs in Greater Mumbai, the highest of any city in India, are increasingly relevant, catapulted from being leisure clubs to prime-time TRP base and potential consumer base to sell merchandise. Mahindra’s association with the sport has been to use his visibility and those of team owners such as Jaipur Pink Panthers’ Abhishek Bachchan and Aishwarya Rai Bachchan to grab the eyeballs.Non-Bollywood team owners such as Rajesh Shah of Mukund Steel, who owns Patna Pirates, have gone the whole hog. Shah has enlisted the presence of friend Vivek Oberoi, and created a theme song ‘Dhool Chata De’ written by Prasoon Joshi, composed by Aadesh Srivastava and sung by Kailash Kher to make the bang bigger. Kabaddi is a sport that has spanned urban, suburban and rural categories across income groups because it needs no equipment more than a 13x 10 sq m piece of land. In schools and towns across India, it is played on mud, derivative of the akhadas, often barefoot, and is one of the few sports that is played equally by both genders.In commercialising and hyping the sport, Sharma admits the promoters have merely tapped into an “underground” movement that has always existed. Collaterally, they have triggered a trickle-down effect that is making kabaddi popular in the gullies. Communication on the field is physical, it is in the tease of a gait, in the aggression of the slap of a thigh. This allows a vocal Indian, unhandicapped by status, dialect or gender, to win. The single largest reason for its connect is this Indianness, this negotiated tradition, says Future Group CEO Kishore Biyani. Over the past few years, top players across sports have emerged from Tier-II and Tier-III towns, and an India that once thought that to be western was cool is increasingly comfortable with the idea of being Indian. “Where we were taken by surprise is with the connect with the younger generation. We simply didn’t expect it,” says Biyani. More than just popular, the players admit, kabaddi has made being Indian, being superstitious, histrionic, emotional, physical and aggressive, incredibly cool.advertisementAlso uniting the players is the newfound pride in the humbleness of background. The burly captain of Puneri Paltans, Wazir Sing, 27, is from a farming family in Ponkheri Kheri in Haryana, works as a policeman and plays for India. He wears his antecedents of struggle and humble origins like a defining badge. All players, in fact, have government jobs. Navneet Gautam has worked with BSNL and ONGC, while Anup Kumar has worked with the CRPF, Air India and is now with Haryana Police. For many families, says Ajay Thakur, the lure of kabaddi was initially in that it was a chance to get a secure government job and pay cheque. These are not players who have had the luxury of endorsement deals. That there is now money in it, a simpler number of lakhs of rupees as opposed to an IPL player’s crores, which they receive as fee for the tournament as per the auction, is a bonus that they never saw coming. Kabaddi, the game of the soil, is making unexpected heroes of the sons of soils.Mitti ki Kasam, or the vow of the earth, is a ritual all kabaddi players follow, as they touch the earth before they enter the pitch and hold it to their eyes and heart in worship. “To us the mitti, the motherland, is everything” says Rakesh Kumar, a railway chief ticket inspector. Despite the shift from earth to synthetic rubber mats, used internationally and introduced in PKL to stylise the game, Kumar doesn’t believe players will ever lose the touch of the soil. “The mats here may be synthetic but back home, we play on mud, so we would never lose that contact. It is what gives us strength,” he says. His teammate, Tae Deok Eom, a star defender from Korea, who speaks little English and has spent his evenings after matches writing every move his rival players make, also touches the earth before entry now, though it is not a practice in Korea.Butter roti, butter naan, tandoori chicken and maa ki dal, he rattles off his newfound favourites. At first his teammates helped him avoid spice, but now he eats what they do. “Why just Mitti ki Kasam, he also shouts ‘Jai Bajrang Bali’,” his teammates tease him. In time spent training in Gujarat, Eom has acquired an Indianness about him, seemingly essential to blend in with the team. For players such as Eom, Waseem Sajjad of Pakistan and Dovlet Bashimov of Turkmenistan, kabaddi has been an introduction to all things quirkily Indian.advertisementThere is a sense of comfort among the players about being able to carry small-town India worldwide. This confidence stems from India topping the kabaddi worldwide rankings. Anup Kumar, captain of U Mumba, admits the changes-30-second raids, players wearing shoes, mats-have been difficult to adapt to. “But you know that if a change is introduced in India, it will soon be introduced worldwide. So you want to be at the forefront of change” he says in Hindi.Kumar, as also several other players, is also comfortable requesting his interviewers to speak in Hindi. The comfort of owning a game invented in India, unlike the adaptation required of those who tour with emerging football or cricketing teams, is intense. It allows Kumar to choose not to struggle with unfamiliar English. They can use a translator, he says. Foreigners on the teams also adapt, picking up Hindi. Kumar is also known for always wearing sunglasses, even off field and at night. He decides his own cool; trend-makers can take it or leave it.U Mumba team owner Screwvala warns against assuming too soon that India has become a leader in kabaddi by being the first to popularise it. “Let’s also remember that there are very few players worldwide. It isn’t great to be on top of those rankings yet. Having said that, more people play kabaddi today than they do even cricket, and cricket itself is on the wane worldwide. I would focus on the fact that we are popularising it within India, rather than internationally, and see where we can take it here,” he says.But India’s influences, as small as they may be, are unmistakably real. David Tsai, a 26-year-old raider from Taiwan, is the first ever professional Kabaddi player from his country, and is studying towards a PhD in kabaddi at the National Taiwan University. He started out by learning kabaddi from YouTube videos of Indian players at the Asian Games matches. “My aim here is to not just play, but to learn new things from India and take them back for my team at home and teach them.” On his return, he will buy regulation game shoes, and pass on techniques that he’s learnt in training.India sets the standards for what gets carried back, he says. There’s greater emphasis on muscle building and weight training in the Southeast Asian countries, he says, but it is every kabaddi player’s dream to come to India and train in technique. “Back home, they call this the Indian NBA” he says. To read more, get your copy of India Today here.last_img read more

first_imgTourism and Entertainment Minister, Hon. Dr. Wykeham McNeill, has commended the Tourism Product Development Company (TPDCo) for its work in maintaining Jamaica’s tourism product at the highest international standard.Speaking at the entity’s staff awards luncheon, at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel, New Kingston, on February 12, under the theme: ‘Celebration of Service in Tourism’, Dr. McNeill underscored the importance of tailoring Jamaica’s tourism provisions to fulfill the needs and expectations of target clients. “Without a great tourism product… no doubt this would result in customer dissatisfaction, something we cannot afford. It is part of your responsibility to ensure that the product meets the highest standards, so that visitors will know, once they arrive on our beautiful shores that steps are being taken to bring the product to its highest level. Your impact in this area has been significant and I want to commend you,” the Minister told the staff.Dr. McNeill noted that efforts to this end have manifested in TPDCo’s focus on training industry workers, instituting appropriate regulations, and partnering with communities in maintaining, beautifying and facilitating infrastructural development.“Over the last few years, I am advised that TPDCo has completed physical works to the tune of over $450 million annually. It has also trained over 11,000 industry workers and assessed just under 5,000 entities annually,” the Minister said.“However, while we have been doing some good work in spurts, we must now begin to press (ahead) on transformational projects in areas such as Port Royal, Falmouth, Ocho Rios and Spanish Town…that will have a larger impact, and involve and benefit even more Jamaicans,” he added.Citing the country’s current economic challenges, Dr. McNeill said the tourism sector is deemed pivotal in efforts to revitalize the economy, while asserting that, “we (tourism stakeholders) are going to have to lead the growth going forward.”“As we forge ahead to transform our tourism product…only the highest ethical standards, the best technical standards, the utmost professional standards, will be good enough. Success will require prudent planning and the creation of a holistic policy framework to foster the sustainable development and transformation of our tourism product,” the Minister emphasized.In her remarks, TPDCo Chairperson, Maxine Henry-Wilson, also commended the agency’s staff, while pointing out that the institution is cognizant of its “immense” role in the tourism sector, and acknowledges that if its mandate is not properly executed, this could “negatively affect our brand”.“I also believe that we are aware of the changing nature of the highly competitive global economy and the changing nature of our visitors, who are no longer content with enjoying just sun, sea and sand. They are, more than ever, more discerning, more sophisticated, and require higher standards across the board,” she said, while underscoring the need to cater to local communities in facilitating the enhancement of the country’s various assets.“All of these elements are key components which help to differentiate us from other destinations. Things are moving at a rapid pace and we must be nimble in our response to the changes, so that we can assist our stakeholders and, by extension, Jamaica’s tourism industry, in maintaining its competitive advantage,” Mrs. Henry-Wilson said.Just over 80 TPDCo employees were presented with special awards for exemplary and outstanding service.The Tourism Product Development Company is the central agency mandated by the Government to facilitate the maintenance, development and enhancement of Jamaica’s tourism product.last_img read more

The best rivalry in professional men’s1In women’s tennis, Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova played each other 80 times, including in 60 finals. tennis history continues to unfold — and it isn’t Roger Federer against Rafael Nadal.It’s Federer against Novak Djokovic.Federer and Nadal are probably the best players of all time.2A whole article, or book, could be written about what that means. In tennis as in other sports, the level of play keeps rising as competitors get bigger, fitter and stronger, so the two dominant players of the last decade likely are the best ever. In relative measures, such as dominance of their peers, major titles and consistency, Federer and Nadal also stand up well to the likes of Pete Sampras and Rod Laver. They may have played the best match of all time. But their head-to-head history is mostly predictable and one-sided. It’s better than nearly every rivalry that came before it, yet it’s not even in the top two current matchups.Nadal’s rivalry with Djokovic, the current world No. 1, is much better. Nadal and Djokovic have met 42 times, more than any other pair since the sport went pro in 1968, according to data provided by Jeff Sackmann of Tennis Abstract. From September 2010 through June of this year, Nadal and Djokovic have played a remarkable 21 times,3More than all but 24 other pairs of players who have played each other throughout their careers since 1968. including in seven major finals, and have contested several classics. But they’ve also played many duds. And while their overall record is nearly even, the rivalry breaks down into several lopsided sub-rivalries: Nadal dominates on clay (14-4), Djokovic on hard (14-7). Nadal won 14 of their first 18 matches; Djokovic has won 15 of 24 since.Compare that to the running feud that is Federer vs. Djokovic. They have been playing close matches since their first meeting after Djokovic’s 20th birthday, when Djokovic won in a winner-take-all third-set tiebreaker. Since then, neither man has won more than three of the matches between them in a row. They’ve been even on every surface: 1-1 on grass, with Federer holding narrow leads of 4-3 on clay and 14-13 on hard courts. Djokovic is 6-4 in finals, Federer 11-10 in semis. They’ve split their 12 Grand Slam matches. They could meet for a 37th time in the World Tour Finals, the year-end event featuring the tour’s best players that ends Sunday in London.These are three of the sport’s greatest rivalries ever, and they remain very much alive, with the three participants currently holding the three top spots in the rankings. The continuing drama of these rivalries owes to the greatness of the trio, the happy coincidence that Nadal and Djokovic were born a year apart and the stubbornness of Federer, sticking around at age 33 to keep challenging his younger rivals.Federer-Djokovic provides plenty of intangible pleasure for neutral fans. Each can defend but prefers to play the aggressor, making for quick reversals and for many unpredictable points. Federer has one of the sport’s most effective serves ever. It has a mighty foil in Djokovic’s possibly best-ever return. Federer’s rekindling of his love for the serve-and-volley raises the tension.Many of their matches have been meaningful and memorable: Federer’s French Open win to break Djokovic’s 43-match winning streak in 2011 was bookended by two Djokovic wins in U.S. Open five-set semifinals after saving match points in 2010 and 2011. Their final this July at Wimbledon was about as high in quality and excitement as Nadal’s more celebrated win over Federer at Wimbledon in 2008.The Federer-Djokovic relationship has occasionally been tense; last July Djokovic’s father criticized Federer’s character. Other external figures keep the rivalry interesting: Djokovic coach Boris Becker and Federer coach Stefan Edberg are former world No. 1s who played each other 35 times.The statistical side of ranking a sport’s best rivalries is necessarily arbitrary. There is no single, universally accepted way to assess matchups, but here is what we can safely look for in a great rivalry: Frequent, competitive matches in significant situations. Just as the world’s best player probably isn’t best at every shot but must be really good at each one, the Federer-Djokovic rivalry doesn’t rule each category but it’s strong in all of them.Let’s take them in turn.FrequencyNadal-Djokovic is the most common meeting among men’s tour players since 1968. Federer-Djokovic ties for second; its next edition will push it past Ivan Lendl-John McEnroe. Nadal-Federer ranks eighth.SignificanceFedal, as fans call it,4Since Nadal has dominated the rivalry, his name probably should come first, but that doesn’t lend itself to as pithy a nickname. Naderer? ranks higher for total significance of matches. Of their 33 meetings, 20 have come in finals — double the number of Federer-Djokovic finals.After Federer’s match Sunday in London, I asked him to compare his rivalries with Nadal and with Djokovic. He ranked his Nadal tussles higher because of all the finals they’ve played. “I know Novak, the matches and the rivalry is nice,” Federer said. “I really enjoy playing against him. It’s very evenly matched, you know. But I played him more often probably in semis than in finals most likely. I don’t know if that’s true, but that’s kind of how it felt like.”He’s right, but you have to win semis to reach finals. I came up with a quick way to assess the importance of matches in winning titles, which I call title leverage.5A final counts as one, a semi as one-half — since winning a semi gives you a chance to play a final — a quarterfinal as one-fourth and a round-of-16 match as one-eighth. By this measure, Nadal-Djokovic ranks first in title leverage overall, and second at Grand Slams. Nadal-Federer is second in title leverage, and first at Grand Slams. Federer-Djokovic ranks sixth and third, respectively.CompetitivenessSo far, Federer-Djokovic looks like a contender for top rivalry but it’s hardly the leader. Consider competitiveness, though, and today’s top two players are the very best at challenging each other:The rivalry is unusually even. Djokovic, who trails in the head-to-head, has won 47.2 percent of their matches. That’s the highest winning percentage for the man who’s trailing in any rivalry with at least 25 matches. They mount comebacks. Two in nine of their matches were won by a player who trailed by a set at some stage. That’s higher than average and ahead of Nadal-Djokovic, though just behind Nadal-Federer.10Matches are considered comebacks only if they occur in completed matches; walkovers, retirements and defaults aren’t included. The sets are close. They’ve played the closest sets of any rivalry with at least 27 meetings.8If the loser of the set won five or more games, I counted that as leaving no games on the table. So I counted a 7-5 set and a 7-6 set the same, as leaving no games. A 6-4 set left one possible game, a 6-3 set two, and so on. Federer-Djokovic has averaged 1.47 games, compared to an average figure for rivalries of at least 15 matches of 1.73. The smaller the figure, the closer the sets. One-third of their sets have been 7-5 or closer. That’s the highest mark for any rivalry with at least 25 meetings.9The average is 25 percent for rivalries with at least 15 meetings. No amount of evidence will trump taste for most tennis fans. They might appreciate a matchup for the personalities, for the aesthetic joy of watching one player’s backhand volley against another’s forehand passing shot. Or they might adopt a favorite in their hearts, not in their minds, after a single memorable match. As much as I enjoy Federer-Djokovic, and especially was gripped while attending their Wimbledon final this year, I had more fun watching two players ranked outside the Top 100 playing a late-night five-setter in the third round of the 2009 U.S. Open.The players themselves use their own criteria for ranking rivalries.I wanted to lay out my entire statistical case to Federer and Djokovic this week, but their post-match press conferences weren’t the right setting. So I asked them, simply, where their rivalry ranked in their careers. Federer ranked his rivalry with Nadal over his tussles with Djokovic. He also put in a good word for rivalries with players closer to his age or older: Tim Henman, David Nalbandian, Lleyton Hewitt, Andy Roddick and Andre Agassi.11Federer won as high a percentage of his matches against those five as Nadal has won against him.“Both of these rivalries that I have with Roger and Rafa are special in their own way,” Djokovic said Wednesday. “I do feel those rivalries have contributed to my success a lot.” And he, like Federer, put in a good word for Nadal-Federer. “Their rivalry was amazing, and still is.”CORRECTION (Nov. 14, 5:25 p.m.): Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova played each other 80 times, including in 60 finals, according to the Women’s Tennis Association. An earlier version of a footnote to this article said that they played each other 56 times, including in 47 finals. (There is some disagreement about their record; Tennis Abstract lists 56 Evert-Navratilova matches and 47 finals while the International Tennis Federation lists 59 non-walkover matches and 50 finals.) They play very few duds. Just 47 percent of their matches have ended in straight sets, below the average rate of 58 percent and below the level for Nadal-Djokovic, though just above the 45 percent for Nadal-Federer. And just 14 percent of Federer-Djokovic matches have been what I call duds: straight-setters without a set 7-5 or closer. The rate is at least 30 percent for the two Nadal rivalries, and averages 33 percent overall for frequent matchups. They rarely leave any tennis unplayed. They’ve played 77.6 percent of possible sets in their matches.6If they finish a best-of-five-set match in four sets, they’ve played 80 percent of possible sets. That’s above average for rivalries with at least 15 matchups,7The average figure is 75 percent. Unless otherwise noted, the averages in this section are among matchups with at least 15 meetings since the professional era began. better than Nadal-Djokovic and behind only Nadal-Federer, by a nose, among rivalries with at least 27 meetings. read more

first_imgPaul Pogba is already dreaming big and hopes to add his own star to the France shirt by winning Sunday’s World Cup final against CroatiaLes Bleus are hoping to end a wait of two decades in Sunday’s final by claiming only their second world title against Croatia.History favours the French, who defeated Croatia in the semi-finals of the 1998 tournament on route to winning the World Cup, but Pogba is aware that both himself and his teammates will have it all to do at Moscow against a side that have performed above all expectations at Russia this summer and have proven themselves to be worthy contenders for the World Cup“Croatia do not have stars – they want one. They have done very well and they want the victory, like us,” said Pogba, according to Sky Sports.“But I do not have a star. It’s on the shirt, but I did not win it. We want to go looking for it like all players. It will be a World Cup final, a great match, difficult.”Croatia have played into extra-time in their last three games now and fatigue has been a concern.“We are not thinking about it,” said Pogba.ole gunnar solskjaer, manchester unitedReport: Up to seven first team players out for United George Patchias – September 13, 2019 Manchester United have some serious injury problems with up to seven first-team players out.This Saturday, United have a Premier League clash with Leicester City….“Croatia played a very tough match against England. They did not give up. They were losing 1-0 and came back.“There are two teams and one cup. They have played 90 minutes more than us – I don’t know if it’s a disadvantage for them or if they’re going to want to show that they want to win even more.“For me, we are not favourites. We did not forget the doubts about us at the beginning of the competition, about our ability to play together.“We haven’t done anything yet.”While Croatia do have Luka Modric in their ranks, Pogba knows better than to just concentrate on him.“It’s not only Modric – there is also (Ivan) Rakitic, (Ivan) Perisic and even the defenders,” he said.“I don’t think there will be a plan for Modric. There will be one for everyone.”last_img read more

first_imgExhibiting the graphic prints from the collection of National Gallery of Modern Art (NGMA), a show titled Celebrating Indigenous Printmaking is being organised in the Capital. The exhibition that opens on 18 September at National Gallery of Modern Art, Jaipur House, will be inaugurated by Shripad Naik, Hon’ble Minister of State for Culture & Tourism (Independent Charge) in the presence of Ravindra Singh, Secretary, Ministry of Culture, and Government of India.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’NGMA aims to acquire and preserve works of modern art from 1850s onwards. It organises exhibitions not only in its own premises but also in other parts of the country and abroad. NGMA also organises lectures, seminars and conference to encourage higher studies and research in the field of art history, art criticism, art appreciation, museology and the inter-relations on visual and performing arts.It is responsible to ensure quality and maintain the standards of excellence. It helps people to look at the works of modern art with joy, understanding and knowledge by extending their relationship with our daily life and experiencing them as vital expressions of the human spirit.last_img read more

first_imgHay fever, also known as allergic rhinitis, is caused by an allergic response to outdoor or indoor allergens such as pollen, dust mites and leads to cold-like runny nose, itchy eyes, congestion, sneezing and sinus pressure.According to a report by the World Health Oragnisation (WHO), 10 to 30 per cent of the population worldwide suffers from hay fever.The findings showed that brains of mice when exposed to a model of grass pollen allergy actually produced more neurons than when they were under normal conditions. During an allergic reaction, an increase in the numbers of new neurons in the hippocampus — the part of the brain responsible for forming new memories, and the site where neurons continue to be formed throughout life — was found. This raised the question that what could be the consequences of allergies on memory, the researchers said.In addition, the allergy also reduced the presence of microglia — brain immune cells that perform immune system functions in the central nervous system – activity. The microglia in the brain of mice were found deactivated.“It was highly unexpected to see the deactivation of microglia in the hippocampus. Partly because other studies have shown the reverse effect on microglia following bacterial infection,” said Barbara Klein, University of Salzburg in Austria. “We know that the response of immune system in the body is different in case of an allergic reaction versus a bacterial infection. What this tells us is that the effect on the brain depends on type of immune reaction in the body,” Klein added.The allergic reaction also caused an increase in neurogenesis — the growth and development of nervous tissue, which is known to decline with age, said the paper published in the journal Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience.last_img read more

first_imgKolkata: State Finance and Industry, minister Amit Mitra on Tuesday said that both Tantuja and Manjusha have seen a remarkable turnaround in the last seven years since the Mamata Banerjee government took over in 2011.Tantuja, that had suffered a loss of Rs 12.69 crore in the year 2010-11 has registered an operational profit of Rs 10.26 crore in the 2017-18 fiscal. In reply to a poser by Trinamool Congress MLA Samir Kumar Jana at the state Assembly, Mitra, who is also in charge of the Micro Small and Medium Enterprises (MSME) and Textiles department stated that Tantuja, in the year 2010-11, has made a business of Rs 55.09 crore and incurred a loss of Rs 12.69 crore. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life”In 2011-12, the very first year we assumed office, we made a profit of Rs 69 lakh. In the 2017-18 fiscal, our turnover has gone up to Rs 204. 90 crore with a profit of Rs 10.26 crore,” the minister said. He also added that Tantuja has made a business of Rs 167.70 crore in the last seven months and the operational profit has been Rs 3.39 crore. According to Mitra, the operational profit for Manjusha has been Rs 5.87 crore in the 2017-18 fiscal and it has also registered a turnover of Rs 91.04 crore. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killed”Manjusha has made a business of Rs 167.70 crore from April to October this year and has made a profit of Rs 7.39 crore,” he said. Elaborating on the reasons behind the turnaround, the minister said Tantuja has gone for massive product diversification in terms of bringing in the latest designs in sarees and has introduced jackets, scarves etc. “The state design centre is coming up with new designs and the weavers are being encouraged to incorporate new and latest designs in sarees,” Mitra added. According to him, the state government has eliminated the role of middlemen in the entire process by introducing the sale of products through e-commerce sites and also doing away with the manual calculation of sale proceeds. “The products are now purchased directly from the Self-Help Groups and the weavers through camps in various parts of the state and payments are made directly to their bank accounts,” Mitra reiterated.last_img read more

first_img17Apr Rep. Hank Vaupel Weekly Column: April 16, 2018 Last week, I spoke at an Opiate Awareness Forum at the Fowlerville UB Church hosted by the Fowlerville Police Department. Awareness is critical to finding solutions and offering help to those who need it, and it was encouraging to see the great cooperation shown from local leaders, law enforcement, and organizations. I was honored to be part of the discussion as we continue working on the issue. Thank you to Fowlerville Police Chief John Tyler for organizing the event and ensuring the community is informed about opiates.***I attended several other local events over the past few weeks. Last Friday, I joined local officials and business leaders for the Emagine Movie Theater groundbreaking ceremony in Hartland. The theater will be located in the Hartland Towne Square Plaza and is expected to open this winter. It was great to welcome a new business to the community, and I am excited for continued economic growth throughout the district.I attended Good Morning Livingston with the Howell Chamber of Commerce where Congressman Mike Bishop was the guest speaker. He spoke on issues being discussed in Washington D.C., including his bipartisan work on various committees. Thank you to Congressman Bishop and the Chamber of Commerce for hosting this important update.***I recently had the opportunity to meet in Lansing with Livingston County residents attending the Right to Life of Michigan annual legislative day. I enjoy any chance to hear from the people of our community so I can better represent them in the Michigan Legislature.***I was happy to participate in a tour of the Lansing Community College (LCC) Health and Human Services facility. I am impressed by the quality curriculums available to students seeking an associate degree in the various health service programs available from the college. LCC also has a branch center in Livingston County where other courses are offered.***On Thursday, I had the privilege of welcoming the Hartland High School hockey team to the Capitol and recognizing them on the House floor. The Hartland Eagles are this year’s state champions, and it was an honor to acknowledge their excellent commitment and hard work. Congratulations, and great job to the team, coaches and staff!***I invite you to join me for my April office hours on Friday, April 20 at the following times and locations:2:30 to 3:30 p.m. at Fowlerville Farms, 941 S. Grand Ave. in Fowlerville;4 to 5 p.m. at Biggby Coffee, 11325 W. Highland Road in Hartland; and5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at All Star Coney Island, 934 Michigan Ave. in Howell.I look forward to seeing you there and hearing your thoughts!***If you have any ideas, comments or questions for my office, please do not hesitate to call us at 517-373-8835 or send an email to HankVaupel@house.mi.gov. We are happy to hear from you! Categories: Vaupel Newslast_img read more