first_imgRichard Baltas621112918%52%$598,163 Doug O’Neill698151112%49%$650,258 Mark Glatt3165419%48%$225,650 Jerry Hollendorfer591081117%49%$891,304 Gary Sherlock2353222%43%$135,110 Stewart Elliott70871311%40%$347,490 SANTA ANITA STATISTICS (Current Through Thursday, Feb. 2) UNIQUE BELLA MEETS CHAMP IN GRADE II LAS VIRGENESThere are those who have mentioned Unique Bella in the same breath with herstablemate,  two-time Eclipse Award champion filly Songbird, although Jerry Hollendorfer likely would say that’s putting the cart before the horse, although he allows that Unique Bella is “a special filly.”The daughter of Tapit tries two turns for the first time in Sunday’s Grade II Las Virgenes Stakes for three-year-old fillies at one mile, and is the 3-5 morning line favorite to succeed.Unique Bella won the Grade II Santa Ynez Stakes at seven furlongs by 7 ½ lengths while geared down in her three-year-old debut, beating stablemate It Tiz Well. Competition is likely to be stiffer Sunday in the form of Eclipse Award champion two-year-old filly Champagne Room, who has been firing morning bullets for her three-year-old debut.Trained by Peter Eurton, Champagne Room has not raced since winning the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies at Santa Anita on Nov. 5.The Las Virgenes, race six of eight: Mopotism, Flavien Prat 6-1; Champagne Room, Mario Gutierrez, 5-2; Mistressofthenight, Corey Nakatani, 15-1; Unique Bella, Mike Smith, 3-5; and Miss Southern Miss, Kent Desormeaux, 6-1. FINISH LINES: Happy Birthday wishes are in order for the Voice of Santa Anita, Michael Wrona.  A native of Brisbane, Australia, Wrona was foaled 51 years ago today . . .  Midnight Storm, a multiple graded stakes winner on both turf and dirt, remains ticketed for the Grade I, $750,000 Santa Anita Handicap on March 11. “Absolutely,” trainer Phil D’Amato said. “That’s what we’re planning. We’re going to breeze this weekend and keep him on that schedule all the way into the race.” Marathoner Big John B. worked five furlongs Thursday in 1:02. “He’s doing great,” D’Amato said. “I missed the San Marcos with him, but we’ll probably hit the next one (San Luis Rey at 1 ½ miles on turf March 25) or the Tokyo City Cup (at 1 ½ miles on dirt April 2), which he won last year.” Also scheduled to work Saturday is three-year-old filly champion of 2015 Stellar Wind for John Sadler . . . Suspension City: Hall of Fame jockey Kent Desormeaux, third in the standings with 14 wins, has been suspended three days (Feb. 12, 16 and 17) for careless riding aboard Aotearoa in Sunday’s ninth race; Martin Garcia has been banished the same three days for careless riding on Senator Robert in Sunday’s fifth race, resulting in a disqualification from second to fifth; Flavien Prat is banned Feb. 9, 10 and 11 for careless riding on Run Macho Run in the second race Feb. 2; and the CHRB has denied Norberto Arroyo Jr.’s appeal from last October, suspending him six days (Feb. 9, 10, 11, 12, 16 and 17) . . . There was one winning Pick Six ticket Thursday worth $319,148, bought through TwinSpires.com for $648 . . . On Sunday, the day of The Big Game, live racing at Santa Anita begins at 11 a.m., allowing fans to watch three-point favorite New England against Atlanta at Sirona’s Sports Bar after the races or to be home in time to see it. Sirona’s will offer $5 drink specials all day. General admission to the track that day is only one dollar. Flavien Prat9522101623%51%$1,283,793 Martin Pedroza5377913%43%$269,443 Mike Smith2161429%52%$607,500 HOLLENDORFER TARGETS THREE STAKES THIS WEEKENDJerry Hollendorfer has horses entered in six races this weekend, three of them stakes, so the Hall of Fame trainer and his assistant Dan Ward will be busy, as is their wont.The 70-year-old Hollendorfer adheres to the U.S. Postal Service credo. Be it rain, sleet or snow, the mail must get through.Hollendorfer has Ike Walker entered in the Grade II Palos Verdes Stakes for four-year-olds and up at six furlongs and Sheer Flattery in the Robert B. Lewis Stakes, both on Saturday. Sunday, Unique Bella tries two turns for the first time in the Grade II Las Virgenes Stakes for three-year-old fillies at one mile.Ike Walker sticks out like a sore thumb in the Palos Verdes, because on form, he doesn’t seem to fit. The five-year-old Bellamy Road gelding was claimed for $50,000 last out when he finished third on a wet/fast track at a mile Jan. 1. Prior to that, his previous 12 starts were all a mile or longer.“The reason we nominated and are running is because we’ve been entering him in other races and they didn’t go,” Hollendorfer said. “I don’t just want to just keep sitting on him. I didn’t have a race picked out for him at Golden Gate, and we couldn’t get in here.“We heard the Palos Verdes was going to come up short so we nominated and decided to run.“It’s probably a bad spot, but if you just keep training them, they can get hurt.”As to Sheer Flattery, who won a maiden allowance race by a nose on a sloppy track Dec. 31, Hollendorfer said, “We think he’s been training well and if he can transfer the race he ran last time to this one, he should have a fairly good chance.”The Palos Verdes, race three: Ike Walker, Flavien Prat, 8-1; Distinctive B, Tyler Baze, 7-2; St. Joe Bay, Kent Desormeaux, 8-5; Ocho Ocho Ocho, Santiago Gonzalez, 7-2; and Moe Candy, Victor Espinoza, 2-1. JockeyMts1st2nd3rdWin%ITM%Money Won Tyler Baze972119822%49%$903,417 Norberto Arroyo, Jr.6495414%28%$458,830 Santiago Gonzalez5168612%39%$264,716 Kent Desormeaux651410722%48%$913,683 Bob Baffert2953517%45%$411,316 TrainerMts1st2nd3rdWin%ITM%Money Won O’NEILL HAS THREE FOR THE MONEY IN ROBERT B. LEWISWith three horses entered, Doug O’Neill has 60 percent in a field of five for Saturday’s Grade III Robert B. Lewis Stakes for three-year-olds at 1 1/16 miles, but it’s not a personal record for the trainer, who won the Kentucky Derby twice in the last four years, with I’ll Have Another in 2012 and last year with champion two-year-old male of 2015 Nyquist.“I remember having three in the Malibu in 2004 when Lava Man ran second (to Rock Hard Ten),” O’Neill said between intermittent rain drops that were not enough to cancel training Friday morning.O’Neill also sent out Harvard Avenue to finish second and Perfect Moon to run third behind Rock Hard Ten, but accounted for only 30 percent of the field as there were 10 starters.O’Neill has Oak Tree Juvenile winner Dangerfield, the maiden Irap, and Cecil B. DeMille winner Term of Art going in the Lewis, which offers 17 Kentucky Derby qualifying points, 10 to the winner.“The pressure’s on,” O’Neill said with a chuckle, alluding to his Lewis majority. “Seriously, all three are doing well. They have the pedigree, they have the class, they’ve got the stride. They’ve all showed glimpses of being that kind of horse, so we’re optimistic.’The field for the Lewis, which goes as the second event on a nine-race card that starts at 12:30 p.m.: Royal Mo, Victor Espinoza, 5-2; Irap, Mario Gutierrez, 3-1; Dangerfield, Kent Desormeaux, 7-2; Term of Art, Tyler Baze, 9-2; and Sheer Flattery, Mike Smith, 2-1. Rafael Bejarano7912101615%48%$740,768 Peter Eurton2373030%43%$324,340 Joseph Talamo60651110%37%$247,090 Philip D’Amato3584623%51%$563,575 William Spawr1360246%62%$172,461 J. Keith Desormeaux1972437%68%$406,275 Luis Contreras58681710%53%$316,054 DISTANCE NO PROBLEM FOR TEXAS RYANOTexas Ryano has a win and a second at a mile and a quarter on turf at Santa Anita.Jockey Joe Talamo hopes the horse’s fancy for those conditions is in tact for Saturday’s Grade II, $200,000 San Marcos Stakes for four-year-olds and up at 1 ¼ miles on turf.“He kind of got backed up in his training with all the rain, like everyone else, but he’s been working very good and the distance is good for him, although to me, he’s a true mile and a half horse,” said Talamo, who has ridden the six-year-old Curlin horse eight times, winning twice, including the Grade II Hollywood Turf Cup last out on Nov. 25.“If you look at his races at a mile and an eighth and a mile and a quarter, he kind of comes running, but the farther the better with him,” Talamo said. “He’s doing well enough where he can try and run ’em down.”Trained by Carla Gaines for owner/breeder Warren Williamson, Texas Ryano boasts a 5-3-3 record from 18 starts with earnings of $438,355.The San Marcos, the last of nine races: A Red Tie Day, Corey Nakatani, 15-1; Flamboyant, Brice Blanc, 4-1; Itsinthepost, Tyler Baze, 12-1; Blue Tone, Martin Garcia, 12-1; Texas Ryano, Joe Talamo, 3-1; Power Ped, Stewart Elliott, 20-1; Perfectly Majestic, Kent Desormeaux, 10-1; Isotherm, Flavien Prat, 6-1; Hi Happy, Altair Dominguez, 10-1; Twentytwentyvision, Mike Smith, 6-1; and Frank Conversation, Mario Gutierrez, 6-1.Gustnado, Conquest Daddyo and Some in Tieme were scratched. UNIQUE BELLA ODDS-ON FOR SUNDAY’S LAS VIRGENESO’NEILL HOPES TO ‘PASS GO’ WITH LEWIS MONOPOLYBUSY WEEKEND AS USUAL FOR TEAM HOLLENDORFERTEXAS RYANO SHOULD COME RUNNING IN SAN MARCOS Peter Miller451113624%67%$666,510 John Sadler2355622%70%$273,824last_img read more

first_imgThe authors of the paper in the previous entry (09/06/2006) found that bacteria swim with near perfect propulsive efficiency.  They only mentioned evolution one time, but it’s short and to the pointless.  It wins Stupid Evolution Quote of the Week: “Such measurements can shed light on how this remarkable ability to swim evolves among different microorganisms.”Still waiting in the dark for payment on this promissory note (03/27/2003 commentary).(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_imgOnly by the most egregious twisting of terms could one call what these scientists did “evolution.”“Directed evolution” is a contradiction in terms. It’s like conjuring up visions of “natural voting” or “unguided targeting.” It’s like “blind sight” or “deaf hearing.” If terms mean anything, what Marcos Alcocer says in The Conversation is absurd, or dishonest, like defending Orwell’s 1984 slogan, “War is peace, freedom is slavery, ignorance is strength.”The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2018 has been awarded to three researchers for their work on “harnessing the power of evolution” to create compounds that are of benefit to humanity. One half of the nine million Swedish kronor (£770,686) prize will go to the American Frances Arnold from the California Institute of Technology, US. The other half will go jointly to the American George Smith from the University of Missouri, US, and the Brit Gregory Winter from the MRC lab in Cambridge, UK.Their work centres on techniques of “directed evolution” – a method which imitates natural selection. This can help to create new powerful proteins that achieve specific tasks.This critique intends no disparagement of the prize winners, who evidently “transformed research and saved lives.” But they didn’t do it by evolution. They did it by intelligent design.And yet all the media, Nature included, are framing this win as a victory for ‘natural selection’ theory. Nature allows this ignorant statement from Sweden:During the prize announcement, Claes Gustafsson, chair of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry 2018, noted the benefits of the researchers’ work for humanity: “Our laureates have applied principles of Darwin in the test tubes, and used this approach to develop new types of chemicals for the greatest benefit of humankind.”What the winners achieved had absolutely nothing to do with Charles Darwin’s theory. To really mimic Darwin’s ‘natural selection,’ the winners would have turned out the lights, walked out the door, and let stuff happen. The moment they made an observation and selected something on purpose, they murdered Darwinism.The media, however, continue mixing Darwin with design, mixing darkness with light. Live Science says, “Chemistry Nobel Awarded to Scientists for Taking the Reins on Evolution.” The moment anyone takes the reins on evolution, stuff stops happening by chance. Intelligence takes over. Darwin-worshiping reporter Yasemin Saplakoglu turns out the lights of logic, making evolution out to be a creative genius:Every living organism on this planet is a sculpture of evolution. Now, evolution is also unfolding in the lab.This year’s Nobel Prize in chemistry was awarded to three scientists for their work in harnessing the power of evolution for a variety of applications that benefit humankind. These new applications helped create biofuels, pharmaceuticals and antibodies that fight disease.A Long History of FallacyHere it is 2018, and this blatant fallacy is still being promoted. Darwin famously used ‘artificial selection’ as a stepping-stone to ‘natural selection,’ which is its polar opposite. You can’t get there from here. Darwin’s contemporary John Herschel called natural selection the “law of higgledy-piggledy,” showing that he understood ‘natural selection’ to be equivalent to ‘stuff happens.’ In the 1980s, Carl Sagan popularized the same grand fallacy by leaping from spectacular examples of artificial selection to natural selection, (paraphrasing), ‘If artificial selection can achieve such amazing changes in just a few years, how much more must natural selection be able to accomplish, given millions of years?’Seeing design in nature, Darwin was trying to achieve it without a Designer, by ascribing creative power to the Stuff Happens Law, which is the opposite of what breeders do. Breeders have a goal. They can role the dice, but they know what they want, and they steer variation toward it. Doug Axe exposes the fallacy at Evolution News, showing that the Nobel Prize was a vindication of intelligent design, not evolution. Nature cannot ‘select’ what does not already exist, he argues. And the word ‘selection’ itself implies a Selector. A philosophical naturalist cannot personify nature as a selector. Selection is not natural; it is a choice made on purpose by an intelligent agent. Even a robot playing ‘Maxwell’s Demon’ (21 Sept 2018) makes a selection based on choice programmed by its designer.Can the Fallacy Be Rationalized?Perhaps their idea of ‘directed evolution’ could be defended metaphorically, the way we use oxymoronic language to refer to ‘black light,’ realizing that ultraviolet radiation is not really black, but just invisible to human retinas. We know that UV light is just as ‘real’ as white light, and would appear bright to a creature able to perceive that part of the electromagnetic spectrum. That’s not what is happening here. The media are specifically referring to Darwin’s principles being employed by the prize winners. It’s not a stylistic oxymoron, used for effect; it’s illogically sophoxymoronic.Maybe the media expect us to see part Darwinism and part design, giving some credit to both. Darwin can have the mutations, and ID can make the selections. Alcocer tries that angle, but it doesn’t wash, because the media portray what the winners did as the same essential process used by their material view of nature to evolve human beings without any intelligent guidance:One of the most crucial characteristics of evolving organisms – life as we know it – is the ability to replicate and mutate. All organisms can make copies of their genes and undergo changes that are passed to their progeny. In other words, we are totally dependent of evolving chemicals.Arnold’s work focused on the directed evolution of enzymes – proteins that accelerate chemical reactions. Because they are so useful, scientists had long tried to create enzymes with desired properties artificially, but with little success.Arnold – who is the fifth to join an important group of women to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry – instead developed a method to produce mutations in the genes that produced certain enzymes in order to select the best ones. Different mutations will produce slightly different versions of the enzyme in each cell so, over time, one can select the one which works the best for a specific task.Arnold’s discovery was hugely important – creating a completely new way to design and produce pharmaceuticals and renewable fuels for a greener transport sector.No ExcusesThe logical flaw in “directed evolution” cannot be overemphasized, because Big Science (BS) and Big Media (BM) are using the Nobel Prize announcement to promote a serious fallacy to a largely unwary readership, who are being led to believe that Darwin’s theory is bearing good fruit in our day. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Darwin envisioned a world of blind, pitiless indifference, where stuff happened in random directions, and nobody was around to care (see “Time to Ditch Natural Selection?”, 3 October 2015). To the extent that these prize winners acted out of compassion to advance human health and well-being, they illustrate the image of God in man, not the image of Darwin.Glorifying Darwin for what these scientists achieved using design is like awarding a Pulitzer Prize to a plagiarist. No; worse. It’s like putting a crown on a dirt pile and calling it a god. I’m honestly having a hard time coming up with an analogy for how rotten this reasoning is. Help me out; send your idea in the comments. (Visited 731 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_imgFormer India leg-spinner Subhash Gupte found himself in the news again, not once but twice. First, the BCCI honoured him with its prestigious C.K. Nayudu Award for 2000.Timed almost in sync, West Indian legend Gary Sobers then declared that the greatest leg-spinner ever was not Aussie Shane Warne but the,Former India leg-spinner Subhash Gupte found himself in the news again, not once but twice. First, the BCCI honoured him with its prestigious C.K. Nayudu Award for 2000.Timed almost in sync, West Indian legend Gary Sobers then declared that the greatest leg-spinner ever was not Aussie Shane Warne but the Indian who, now 72, lives in Trinidad.Gupte played for India from 1951 to 1962 and bamboozled the world’s best batsmen. Sobers revealed that unlike most leggies, he could bowl two googlies.Gupte was a man with an independent spirit and a fierce temper, who kowtowed to no one and so played fewer Tests than he should have. They say when the cricket ball left his hand, you could hear it whizzing through the air.Tests36Wickets149Best9/102Avg.29.55Econ rate2.34Strike rate75.75W/I1210W/M1last_img read more