first_imgCrescent City >> The Arcata Tigers and McKinleyville Panthers opened the 2016 Humboldt-Del Norte Conference cross country season in impressive fashion Wednesday afternoon at Del Norte Golf Course.The Tigers swept both the boys and girls individual titles — with Kellen O’Neill winning the boys race with a time of 15 minutes, nine seconds and Riley Martel-Phillips taking the girls race with a time of 18:30. Martel-Phillips also led the Arcata girls to a team victory as the Tigers placed three …last_img read more

first_imgPUC also pleasedFollowing Wilson’s ruling in district court, the PUC released a statement of its own, pointing out that the decision “confirmed that the Commission acted lawfully and that the decision to protect non-[net -metered] customers from unreasonable cost-shifts was based on substantial evidence.”The only part of the PUC’s December order that was vacated applied to existing net-metered customers, the commission said, “for whom the court found that the commission did not provide sufficient notice.”The court decision did not overrule the PUC’s conclusion that net-metering would unfairly shift $16 million in costs from solar to non-solar customers, Utility Dive reported. The argument that non-solar customers subsidize those who can afford solar panels is a common refrain by utilities in net-metering cases. Some studies, however, have found that utilities understate the value of distributed solar energy. Retail Net Metering Will End in NevadaNet-Metering Survives California TestNet-Metering Is Preserved in KansasMajor Utility Wants Lower Net-Metering RatesWisconsin Alters Net-Metering RulesResidential Solar in Nevada Benefits All, Study SaysMaine Completes Value of Solar Study RELATED ARTICLES Regulators had approved a proposal from NV Energy late last December to triple monthly service charges for solar customers, from $12.75 to $38.51, while reducing the reimbursement rate for excess solar electricity from the retail to the wholesale rate of 2.6 cents per kilowatt hour over a period of four years. But the plan lacked a grandfather clause protecting customers who already had installed solar panels, and both customers and installers were livid. SolarCity and other installers said that they would no longer do business in Nevada, and a group of solar customers filed a class action lawsuit to block the plan.The case in which Wilson ruled last week was filed against the PUC of Nevada by Vote Solar, a solar advocacy group.“This court decision is a win for existing solar customers, although there’s still plenty of work left to be done to bring solar choice and solar jobs back to Nevada,” Jessica Scott of Vote Solar said in a statement posted at the group’s web site. “The court rightly ruled that the PUCN unfairly changed the rules of the game on existing solar customers without due notice. We believe we had a strong legal case for reversing the decision for future solar customers as well and would have appreciated the opportunity to better make that case through oral arguments, which we were not allowed in this case.”center_img Homeowners in Nevada with photovoltaic (PV) systems got some welcome news last week in the form of a unanimous decision by utility regulators allowing them to keep full retail net-metering reimbursements for the next 20 years.The settlement, worked out by the utility NV Energy, the staff of the state’s Public Utilities Commission, solar installer SolarCity, and the state’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, reverses a controversial decision late last year that boosted fixed charges and lowered reimbursement rates for homeowners with PV systems. The settlement deal was approved by the PUC last Friday. It will affect 32,000 solar customers in the state, according to an article posted at Utility Dive.The announcement followed by less than a week a ruling by District Court Judge James Wilson throwing out the PUC’s rate plan for customers who own PV systems. Judge Wilson ruled that the rate plan was a “denial of fairness and due process through inadequate notice.”However, Wilson also found that the changes to net-metering and fixed service charges for new solar-equipped customers were neither arbitrary nor capricious and did not violate the U.S. Constitution. And the settlement approved last week affirms those terms. Deal ends a period of uncertaintyIt’s been a wild year for owners of PV systems in Nevada. After the PUC decision in December, Governor Brian Sandoval created a task force representing the solar industry, regulators, and environmentalists to examine net-metering issues. Then, in July, Sandoval announced he would not reappoint PUC Commissioner David Noble, the regulator who had written the net-metering decision. As Utility Dive reported, Sandoval said that he wanted a “new direction” for the PUC.The decision paid off for the solar industry. Existing solar customers got their rates back, prompting a warm endorsement from the Solar Energy Industries Association.“We thank Governor Sandoval for his leadership and support and appreciate the steps taken by the PUCN to stabilize solar policy,” the SEIA said. “We now must put policies in place that support new solar customers in Nevada so that solar jobs can once again increase, and the robust economic activity associated with solar development can resume.”The agreement, however, doesn’t directly address whether the solar customers who have been paying higher rates, and getting lower reimbursements for excess power, will be reimbursed. And, as SolarCity pointed out, the deal still leaves some solar customers in a separate rate class, with new solar households paying the higher fixed charges and getting lower reimbursements.“The Public Utilities Commission’s decision to grandfather existing solar customers is an important step forward for Nevada, to protect the investments thousands of Nevadans have made in our clean energy economy, and affirms that grandfathering should be the law of the land,” Jon Wellinghoff, SolarCity’s chief policy officer said in a written statement.SolarCity said that the agreement will grandfather all state residents who had applied to install solar panels by the end of 2015. That includes thousands of people who have yet to install their solar systems, and can now move ahead with their plans.SolarCity Deputy Director Chandler Sherman said in an email last week, “Unfortunately, the rules still in place for the rest of Nevada make rooftop solar unaffordable for anyone who wishes to go solar in the future. Solar applications have fallen 99% since the decision (only 176 people have applied to go solar in the past seven months under the current net metering policies, down from about 1,400 per month before the PUC decision), which is not enough customers to sustain the once-booming solar industry. SolarCity cannot restart operations until the state sets solar policies that work for consumers.”last_img read more

first_imgBrace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC “Have been very, very tough conditions yesterday and today,” said the top-ranked Nadal, who played at night on Friday after the temperatures had dropped. “It’s not nice to see players suffering that much on court.”The tournament’s extreme heat policy calls for the roofs to be closed on the main show courts and play to be suspended on outer courts when the temperature reaches 40 degrees Celsius (104 Fahrenheit) and the wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT), which takes into account humidity and wind speed, reaches 32.5 Celsius (90.5 Fahrenheit).FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe high temperature Friday marginally topped 40 Celsius, but the WBGT remained below the threshold, so play was not halted.Cornet said she began feeling dizzy at the beginning of the second set against Belgium’s Elise Mertens and, at one point, fell to her back on the court in obvious distress. She received a medical timeout so a trainer could check her pulse and blood pressure and wrap her in an ice vest before she returned to the court. Cornet was able to finish the match, losing 7-5, 6-4. But she later said it was “dangerous” to play in that kind of heat.“The (official) limit of not playing the match is really high. I think this limit should be a little bit lower because playing in this condition is not nice for anyone,” she said. “I would never give up because of (the heat), that’s for sure. But you push your body so hard, you almost feel like you’re on the edge.”Tournament director Craig Tiley defended the response of officials to the extreme heat on both Thursday and Friday, saying “we start the event with this set of rules and policies in place, and in the interest of fairness, can’t change them halfway through.”“Protecting our players and the fairness of the competition is paramount in these conditions, which we acknowledge can be challenging,” he said, adding the extreme heat policy would be reviewed after the tournament to see if adjustments need to be made.Petra Martic, who won a two-hour, third-round match against Luksika Kumkhum during the hottest part of the day on Friday, said she got blisters on her feet from the sizzling court and had to take painkillers after the second set.ADVERTISEMENT France’s Alize Cornet is attended to by a trainer and tournament staff after suffering from the heat during her third round match against Belgium’s Elise Mertens at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Friday, Jan. 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Andy Brownbill)MELBOURNE, Australia — French player Alize Cornet has called for the extreme heat policy at the Australian Open to be re-evaluated after she said she nearly fainted in the broiling temperatures during her third-round match Friday at Melbourne Park.Other players echoed her concerns, with Rafael Nadal saying playing in such extreme heat can be “a little bit dangerous for the health.”ADVERTISEMENT Asian shares slide on weak Japan data; US markets closed 8th Top Leaders Forum assessed the progress of public-private efforts in building climate and disaster resilient communities Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding View comments DOST-Pagasa 11 A.M. weather update, November 22, 2019 PLAY LIST 05:08DOST-Pagasa 11 A.M. weather update, November 22, 201900:50Trending Articles04:04‘Quiel’ now a severe tropical storm – Pagasa01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Defense wins games for GlobalPort in streak Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa “It’s really tough on your feet to play in these conditions,” she said. “I was hoping they would close (the roof), but the temperature was not high enough. … So unfortunately it stayed this way.”French player Gael Monfils staggered through part of his second-round loss to Novak Djokovic on Thursday, saying he “had a small heat stroke for 40 minutes,” and likewise described the conditions as a risk to players.Roger Federer, who requested to play at night to avoid the blistering heat on Thursday, said he believed the officials were doing the best they could under the circumstances.“What do you do … stop all matches? The lucky guys on the big courts, they get to play under the roof. The other guys get postponed till the next day? Is that great?” he said. “Is everybody going to finish at 3 in the morning, like a rainy day in New York. I’ve had that, too. Is that better? I’m not sure, honestly.”Click here for more weather related news.” Read Next MOST READ Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH LATEST STORIES Do not bring these items in SEA Games venues BI on alert for illegally deployed OFWs to Iraqlast_img read more