first_imgJun 2, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Colorado’s new system for tracking hospital admissions related to influenza is a potential model for measuring the burden of serious flu complications and the severity of flu seasons, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said today.Last September Colorado became the first state to require the reporting of hospital admissions for laboratory-confirmed flu in all age-groups, the CDC says in the Jun 3 issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Though some existing surveillance systems yield estimates of flu-related hospitalizations, no other state or national system is designed to pick up all such cases.Colorado’s first season of experience with the system indicates that “implementation of statewide, population-based surveillance for influenza-associated hospitalizations is feasible and useful for assessing the age-specific burden of serious influenza-associated morbidity and the relative severity of influenza seasons,” the CDC says.For purposes of reporting, flu-associated hospitalization was defined as a hospital admission accompanied by laboratory confirmation of flu, including confirmation by a rapid diagnostic test, according to the article. Reporting is done mainly by hospital infection-control practitioners (ICPs), who either use the state’s Web-based disease reporting system or fax reports to the state health department.By Apr 16, 2005, 50 Colorado hospitals had reported a total of 964 flu-related hospitalizations, yielding a rate of 21.0 per 100,000 people, the CDC reports. Cases peaked in the week that ended Feb 19; the same week marked the peak for the percentage of patient visits attributed to flu-like illness, as reported by sentinel healthcare providers in Colorado.By age-group, the highest rate of flu-related hospitalization was in people aged 80 and older, with 207.3 cases per 100,000. The next highest rates per 100,000 were in babies younger than 6 months, 183.0; 70- to 79-year-olds, 78.0; and children aged 6 to 23 months, 66.3. People aged 18 to 39 years had the lowest rate at 5.8 cases per 100,000.The CDC says the Colorado figures are similar to estimates based on national hospital discharge data. Those estimates include an average of 36.8 cases per 100,000 population for pneumonia and flu hospitalizations for flu seasons from 1979-80 through 2000-01.While national estimates based on hospital discharge data take at least a year to compile, the Colorado system yields “real-time, population-based” numbers. “The system provides improved ability to assess the severity of influenza seasons, track the time course of the season, determine which populations are most affected by severe influenza-related illness, and focus prevention and control efforts on those populations,” the CDC states.A national system like Colorado’s could help guide flu immunization policy and help health agencies quickly determine if a flu season is causing high rates of hospitalizations, the article says. In addition, such a system could help identify a flu pandemic and guide the public health response.Ken Gershman, MD, MPH, a Colorado epidemiologist who contributed much of the MMWR article, said Colorado had previously required healthcare providers to report all positive influenza tests. The switch to requiring only the reporting of cases involving hospitalization has lightened the workload for providers, he told CIDRAP News.”Over the past 5 or 6 years we’ve seen the number of positive tests go up quite high, because the availability of tests has become widespread,” said Gershman, who is chief of the communicable disease program in the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. “Two years ago, we had about 13,000 reports in our system, and that overwhelmed hospitals and public health.” As a result, hospitals supported changing the requirement to cover only hospital admissions, because they could see it would be less burdensome, he added.Gershman said that while Colorado is the only state that requires reporting of flu-related hospital admissions in all age-groups, a CDC colleague told him that New Jersey requires reporting of hospital cases among children.The MMWR article says the surveillance program has some limitations that are likely to result in underestimates of cases. One is that not everyone hospitalized with a respiratory illness or a flu-related exacerbation of a chronic disease is likely to be tested for flu. A second is that rapid flu tests are less sensitive than viral culture tests.The possibility of making flu-related hospitalizations reportable in more states will be discussed at next week’s annual meeting of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, CDC spokeswoman Jennifer Morcone told CIDRAP News today.CDC. Surveillance for laboratory-confirmed, influenza-associated hospitalizations—Colorado, 2004-05 influenza season. MMWR 2005 Jun 3;54(21):535-7See also:Sep 22, 2004, CIDRAP News story “Flu-related hospitalizations have risen among elderly”last_img read more

first_imgJoan Gail Behnke, 69, of Dillsboro, formerly of Columbus, IN passed away Friday, November 9, 2018 at High Point Health in Lawrenceburg.  Joan was born Saturday, April 16, 1949 in New York, New York the daughter of Robert and Olive (Pugh) Behnke.  She was a retired school teacher and a former librarian and special education teacher at Covington Public Schools.  She attended many churches, loved talking to people, enjoyed checking up on former students, loved her family and liked playing solitaire.Joan is survived by daughter Jennifer Lucas of Dillsboro, grandchildren: Zachary and Isiah Eisenmenger and Sarah Deaton.  She was preceded in death by her parents.A service celebrating Joan’s life will be 11 AM Friday, November 16, 2018 at Dillsboro United Methodist Church, 10071 Front Street, Dillsboro, 47018, with Pastor Deb Beason officiating.  In lieu of flowers memorials may be made to Filter-DeVries-Moore Funeral Home to help the family during this difficult time.  Filter-DeVries-Moore Funeral Home entrusted with arrangements, Box 146, Dillsboro, 47018, (812) 432-5480.  You may go to filterdevriesmoorefuneralhome to leave an online condolence message for the family.last_img read more

first_img Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditThe Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:___Jacksonville Jaguars defensive end/special teams standout Lerentee McCray has opted out of the 2020 season because of the coronavirus pandemic. McCray is entering his seventh NFL season, the last three with Jacksonville. He also played with Denver and Buffalo.“With the health and safety of my family in mind, I have decided to opt out of the 2020 season during these trying times in ‘Our Nation,’” McCray said. “I was honored to be involved in our team’s social justice efforts during this offseason, and I look forward to continuing to support those affected in any way I can.”McCray is the second Jaguars player in as many days to opt out, following veteran defensive tackle Al Woods.Also Saturday, the Jaguars placed cornerback D.J. Hayden (knee) and tight end James O’Shaughnessy (knee) on the active/physically unable to perform list following physicals.___ The Latest: Jaguars’ McCray opts out of season Associated Press August 1, 2020 A tennis player entered for the Palermo Ladies Open has tested positive for the coronavirus and withdrawn from the tournament, organizers announced Saturday.They did not name the player.While noting that the player is asymptomatic, the WTA Tour said in a statement that she will remain in isolation “until cleared by a physician per the established protocols.”The women’s tour added that “all those who may have been in close contact with the individual are undergoing testing per WTA protocols.” It said the tournament “will continue as planned.” Local organizers said the player was admitted to a national health facility designated for asymptomatic patients with COVID-19.___More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sportslast_img read more

first_imgSourav GangulyAdvertisement 9w8cNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vsa43vWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Eay8e3b( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) py43wvWould you ever consider trying this?😱ozCan your students do this? 🌚aw2p2Roller skating! Powered by Firework Sourav Ganguly was recently elected as the new BCCI President and many believe the age of corruption in cricket in India will come to an abrupt end as ‘Dada’ is in control of the reigns. The former Indian captain is strong on ethics and also promises not to meddle in team selection affairs as that is out of his mandate.Advertisement Ganguly spoke to Hindustan Time at length about many interesting topics.Advertisement On Split Captaincy in white-ball cricket“It has often been wondered whether Rohit Sharma’s experience of leading the Mumbai Indians in the IPL and also the national side in the absence of Kohli is enough for him to be made the white-ball captain. I don’t think that is required to be even discussed now,” said Ganguly.Advertisement On his new role“I have an enormous belief in myself. You give me something and if it needs to be turned around, I think I will. And that nobody became a good cricketer sitting in the dressing room. You will only be respected if you take a difficult challenge head-on. Give me responsibility and I will give it my best shot. Leave me alone and I might fall asleep.”How difficult is it to deal with Virat Kohli?“Not difficult at all. I just won’t get involved in team selection matters,” said Ganguly.Other measures to increase interest in Tests“These things move in a cycle. Yes, I was disappointed with the performance of South Africa on their last tour but I guess they need some time to get things in order and be the team I remember playing against. It is the same with Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Some time ago, Australia were not doing all that well but they have now turned things around.”On the national selection committee“We will look at people who have experience and competence.” Advertisementlast_img read more