first_imgThe Gujarat government on Monday canceled all permissions granted to the bankrupt Sterling group promoted by the absconding Sandesara brothers to develop an all-weather port in Dahej.The absconding promoters of the Sterling group – Nitin and Chetan Sandesara – are alleged to have defrauded over ₹ 14,500 crore of public money. Two of their flagships–Sterling Biotech and Sterling SEZ are in bankruptcy tribunals now.Both the brothers are absconding since their names came up in the bank loan scam and money laundering activities and federal agencies began probing them.“Chief minister Vijay Rupani today decided to cancel all the permissions given for building an all-weather berthing port at Dahej to Sterling Ports of Nitin Sandesara,” the chief minister’s office said in a statement on Monday.“Rupani has also directed the Gujarat Maritime Board to recover the amount that the company had to pay as bank guarantees and also to take re-possession of the 84.95 hectares given to the company for developing the port,” the statement added.The Gujarat Maritime Board and a consortium led by Sterling Biotech had entered into an agreement to develop the Dahej port as an all-weather direct berthing port in 2009.Following this, the board had handed over 84.95 hectares to the group in 2010.The Sterling consortium had formed a new company – Sterling Port – to develop the port and had also signed a concession agreement in 2014 with the board.As per the agreement, the company was to invest ₹ 2,500 crore in the first phase and had to deposit 1.5 percent of the equity along with another ₹ 5 crore as performance guarantee with the maritime board.But the company is yet to start any work on the port, government officials said, adding it even failed to deposit ₹ 37.50 crore which it had to pay as bank guarantee to the government.Earlier in the day, the board of directors of the maritime board met and recommended to cancel the contract, they said, adding following this, the Chief Minister ordered cancellation of all the agreements and permissions given to the Sandesara group.The Sandesaras brothers are alleged to have committed bank frauds to the tune of ₹ 14,500 crore of the one by Sterling Biotech alone is around ₹8,100 crore, according to the Enforcement Directorate. The brothers have been absconding since the federal agency CBI registered a bank fraud case against them in 2017.last_img read more

first_imgJaipur Pink Panthers and U Mumba players in action during the final of the Pro Kabaddi league in Mumbai.As Jaipur Pink Panthers’ captain Niketan Gautam stepped into the ballroom of the after-party hosted by promoter Anand Mahindra in honour of the Pro Kabaddi League winners (PKL) at the Four Seasons’,Jaipur Pink Panthers and U Mumba players in action during the final of the Pro Kabaddi league in Mumbai.As Jaipur Pink Panthers’ captain Niketan Gautam stepped into the ballroom of the after-party hosted by promoter Anand Mahindra in honour of the Pro Kabaddi League winners (PKL) at the Four Seasons’ Hotel, Mumbai, he could not help but break into a dance with his trophy. He hugged people with it, grabbed hors d’oeuvres with it, shook hands of corporate honchos, air-kissed socialites with it, and headed to the dance floor with it.His teammates, stylishly attired in pink and blue and gathered around star player Mani, aka Maninder Singh, followed suit, awkwardly spreading out in a space they were clearly not used to. Jasvir Singh, sledger par excellence on field, grinned nervously. As the runners-up, U Mumba, shyly filed in, ushers pushed them out away from entering via the dining area and through the main hall, where they downed their drinks too quickly, and stuck to the sides of the halls. Rajesh Narwal, 24, the raider from Ridhana in Haryana, bent to touch the feet of team owner Ronnie Screwvala and his wife Zarine Mehta as they entered. By 1 a.m., a busload of Puneri Paltans joined in, and by 3 a.m., the Patna Pirates were tearing each others’ shirts off. At the first afterparty of the first PKL season, coveted by corporate well-heeled, the boys from baulk lines, its stars, were finally cool.And it’s taking some getting used to. Rahul Choudhari, star raider for the Telugu Titans, and one of the most stylish players in the league, has been overwhelmed. “I am not able to sit, in a bus, on a flight, without people coming up to me,” he says. At 26, he is watching his mother being inundated with marriage proposals. But more than anything else, where some 70 clubs played kabaddi in his hometown of Bijnor in Uttar Pradesh, he says, over 250 have mushroomed. The story repeats, from Patna Pirates captain Rakesh Kumar, who is from Nizampur in Delhi, to Anup Kumar, who is from Palra in Haryana and leads U Mumba. Where the IPL had 453 million viewers in the first 15 days, and the FIFA World Cup attracted 129 million viewers, Star Sports says the PKL hit 288 million viewers.advertisementIt’s what founder PKL promoters and brothers-in-law Charu Sharma and Mahindra call “bringing kabaddi out of the shadows and into the sunlight”. Sharma, leaning excitedly into every stand in the finals, accedes his sun is now shining brightly indeed. They’ve just announced a women’s league and a World Cup. He says as a franchise they kept expenses low and generated revenues reasonable enough to allow them to dream of breaking even. At the start of the season, Sharma kept telling team owners not to sell to people who would make them wait two days in their offices. Today, he says, they are welcomed, but no one is selling. There is faith that profitability will come.The myth that kabaddi is a rural sport is broken. The 415 professional kabaddi clubs in Greater Mumbai, the highest of any city in India, are increasingly relevant, catapulted from being leisure clubs to prime-time TRP base and potential consumer base to sell merchandise. Mahindra’s association with the sport has been to use his visibility and those of team owners such as Jaipur Pink Panthers’ Abhishek Bachchan and Aishwarya Rai Bachchan to grab the eyeballs.Non-Bollywood team owners such as Rajesh Shah of Mukund Steel, who owns Patna Pirates, have gone the whole hog. Shah has enlisted the presence of friend Vivek Oberoi, and created a theme song ‘Dhool Chata De’ written by Prasoon Joshi, composed by Aadesh Srivastava and sung by Kailash Kher to make the bang bigger. Kabaddi is a sport that has spanned urban, suburban and rural categories across income groups because it needs no equipment more than a 13x 10 sq m piece of land. In schools and towns across India, it is played on mud, derivative of the akhadas, often barefoot, and is one of the few sports that is played equally by both genders.In commercialising and hyping the sport, Sharma admits the promoters have merely tapped into an “underground” movement that has always existed. Collaterally, they have triggered a trickle-down effect that is making kabaddi popular in the gullies. Communication on the field is physical, it is in the tease of a gait, in the aggression of the slap of a thigh. This allows a vocal Indian, unhandicapped by status, dialect or gender, to win. The single largest reason for its connect is this Indianness, this negotiated tradition, says Future Group CEO Kishore Biyani. Over the past few years, top players across sports have emerged from Tier-II and Tier-III towns, and an India that once thought that to be western was cool is increasingly comfortable with the idea of being Indian. “Where we were taken by surprise is with the connect with the younger generation. We simply didn’t expect it,” says Biyani. More than just popular, the players admit, kabaddi has made being Indian, being superstitious, histrionic, emotional, physical and aggressive, incredibly cool.advertisementAlso uniting the players is the newfound pride in the humbleness of background. The burly captain of Puneri Paltans, Wazir Sing, 27, is from a farming family in Ponkheri Kheri in Haryana, works as a policeman and plays for India. He wears his antecedents of struggle and humble origins like a defining badge. All players, in fact, have government jobs. Navneet Gautam has worked with BSNL and ONGC, while Anup Kumar has worked with the CRPF, Air India and is now with Haryana Police. For many families, says Ajay Thakur, the lure of kabaddi was initially in that it was a chance to get a secure government job and pay cheque. These are not players who have had the luxury of endorsement deals. That there is now money in it, a simpler number of lakhs of rupees as opposed to an IPL player’s crores, which they receive as fee for the tournament as per the auction, is a bonus that they never saw coming. Kabaddi, the game of the soil, is making unexpected heroes of the sons of soils.Mitti ki Kasam, or the vow of the earth, is a ritual all kabaddi players follow, as they touch the earth before they enter the pitch and hold it to their eyes and heart in worship. “To us the mitti, the motherland, is everything” says Rakesh Kumar, a railway chief ticket inspector. Despite the shift from earth to synthetic rubber mats, used internationally and introduced in PKL to stylise the game, Kumar doesn’t believe players will ever lose the touch of the soil. “The mats here may be synthetic but back home, we play on mud, so we would never lose that contact. It is what gives us strength,” he says. His teammate, Tae Deok Eom, a star defender from Korea, who speaks little English and has spent his evenings after matches writing every move his rival players make, also touches the earth before entry now, though it is not a practice in Korea.Butter roti, butter naan, tandoori chicken and maa ki dal, he rattles off his newfound favourites. At first his teammates helped him avoid spice, but now he eats what they do. “Why just Mitti ki Kasam, he also shouts ‘Jai Bajrang Bali’,” his teammates tease him. In time spent training in Gujarat, Eom has acquired an Indianness about him, seemingly essential to blend in with the team. For players such as Eom, Waseem Sajjad of Pakistan and Dovlet Bashimov of Turkmenistan, kabaddi has been an introduction to all things quirkily Indian.advertisementThere is a sense of comfort among the players about being able to carry small-town India worldwide. This confidence stems from India topping the kabaddi worldwide rankings. Anup Kumar, captain of U Mumba, admits the changes-30-second raids, players wearing shoes, mats-have been difficult to adapt to. “But you know that if a change is introduced in India, it will soon be introduced worldwide. So you want to be at the forefront of change” he says in Hindi.Kumar, as also several other players, is also comfortable requesting his interviewers to speak in Hindi. The comfort of owning a game invented in India, unlike the adaptation required of those who tour with emerging football or cricketing teams, is intense. It allows Kumar to choose not to struggle with unfamiliar English. They can use a translator, he says. Foreigners on the teams also adapt, picking up Hindi. Kumar is also known for always wearing sunglasses, even off field and at night. He decides his own cool; trend-makers can take it or leave it.U Mumba team owner Screwvala warns against assuming too soon that India has become a leader in kabaddi by being the first to popularise it. “Let’s also remember that there are very few players worldwide. It isn’t great to be on top of those rankings yet. Having said that, more people play kabaddi today than they do even cricket, and cricket itself is on the wane worldwide. I would focus on the fact that we are popularising it within India, rather than internationally, and see where we can take it here,” he says.But India’s influences, as small as they may be, are unmistakably real. David Tsai, a 26-year-old raider from Taiwan, is the first ever professional Kabaddi player from his country, and is studying towards a PhD in kabaddi at the National Taiwan University. He started out by learning kabaddi from YouTube videos of Indian players at the Asian Games matches. “My aim here is to not just play, but to learn new things from India and take them back for my team at home and teach them.” On his return, he will buy regulation game shoes, and pass on techniques that he’s learnt in training.India sets the standards for what gets carried back, he says. There’s greater emphasis on muscle building and weight training in the Southeast Asian countries, he says, but it is every kabaddi player’s dream to come to India and train in technique. “Back home, they call this the Indian NBA” he says. To read more, get your copy of India Today here.last_img read more

first_imgNEWARK, N.J. — Before heading to a shootout, New Jersey Devils coach Pete DeBoer took some advice from veteran forward Patrik Elias and inserted little used reserve Jacob Josefson into the lineup.It paid off and ended a whole lot of frustration.Josefson scored the lone goal in the shootout and Cory Schneider made it stand up as the Devils earned a come-from-behind 2-1 victory over the Winnipeg Jets on Oct. 30.The Devils had dropped an NHL-record 18 straight shootouts, including all 13 last season and one more this season.“He’s been really good in the shootout in practice,” DeBoer said of Josefson. “Patrik keeps bringing up his name and said that he has a knack of scoring in practice. He threw Jo’s name up there, saying Jo’s been good.”So DeBoer went with it and was rewarded.Michael Ryder forced overtime for New Jersey, scoring the tying goal with 3:27 left in regulation.The Devils hadn’t won in a shootout since March 2013, also against Winnipeg.“It was our first shootout win in what seems like 10 years,” DeBoer said. “It was big for us. To say that it lifted a huge weight off my shoulders would be an understatement.“We felt that if we could tie it, we had a chance. I’m always confident in our players. I knew we were going to win shootouts this year. I’m always trying to instill confidence in this group.”Josefson, the Devils’ second shootout shooter, lifted a shot over sprawling goalie Ondrej Pavelec.“He was under a lot of pressure, and he made a great shot,” DeBoer said of Josefson.New Jersey earned its first home victory in four games this season and snapped the Jets’ two-game winning streak.Blake Wheeler, who led the Jets with 28 goals last season, netted his fourth of the season in the first period. Wheeler took a great pass from Toby Enstrom as Pavelec headed to the bench during a delayed penalty.“We honestly deserved better,” Wheeler said. “We couldn’t capitalize on our opportunities and let them hang around. They found a way to tie it up and then won. It’s too bad.”The Devils tied it when Ryder stole the puck and fired a shot past Pavelec during another delayed penalty. It was Ryder’s second goal of the season.“I managed to get the turnover there, and got it to my stick,” Ryder said. “I was going to try to go around him (Pavelec), but I was able to get it up high.”That set up the shootout dramatics. “It was a big play,” DeBoer said. “We really needed that. It was a big play at the right time. We need our forwards to step up and finish some chances.”Pavelec was outstanding in making 27 saves. “We should have been able to close this out,” Pavelec said. “We should find a way to win this.”Jets coach Paul Maurice wasn’t too upset with the result.“It was a pretty good, grind it out type game,” Maurice said. “It was a pretty solid road game. We didn’t give up much. Mistakes happen, and we have to learn from them.”Schneider stopped 24 shots through overtime and then three more in the shootout.“He was outstanding,” DeBoer said. “If he doesn’t play as well as he did, we wouldn’t have anything. After they got the first goal, he was the difference. He gave us a chance to come back and turn it around.”In the third period, Winnipeg’s Mark Scheifele had a breakaway that was stopped by Schneider. Soon after, Wheeler skated in on Schneider and had him beat, but his backhand attempt went wide.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

first_imgSeveral Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA) extension officers are currently engaged in a two-day sorrel harvesting training programme, aimed at equipping them with knowledge on production techniques to be transferred to farmers. Experts from the University of Chapingo in Mexico, are providing training to 20 officers from all parishes on the correct use of the sorrel harvesting machine, designed and manufactured by the university, to reduce harvesting time and cost.  They will also receive instruction in colour stabilisation in sorrel and secondary products. Speaking at the opening ceremony for the training programme, held at the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA) at Hope Gardens, St. Andrew on November 7, Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Roger Clarke, said the initiative will help to increase the efficiency of sorrel production and reduce labour costs. “In Jamaica, the challenge exists in the harvesting of the sorrel, which is very labour intensive. It takes two persons approximately 15 days to harvest one acre of sorrel. In order to increase our competitiveness on the global market, we must find a way to reduce our labour cost,” he said. Minister Clarke further expressed the hope that the knowledge and practical skills garnered in the training programme “will not end with our extension officers but will be promulgated to our farmer groups, agro-processors and even the small and medium entrepreneurs”. Mexican Ambassador to Jamaica, His Excellency, Gerardo Lozano, reiterated Mexico’s commitment to “continue consolidating our co-operation exchanges with Jamaica within the primary fields of agriculture modernisation, crop health and food safety”. He reminded that through a previous co-operation programme between Jamaica and Mexico, the Scientific Research Council (SRC) gained knowledge on sorrel cultivation, harvesting and processing operations developed in Mexico, while Mexico identified new areas for development of sorrel. “Based on this good experience, the Jamaican authorities were able to identify the potential of the utilisation of the sorrel harvesting machine as a relevant tool to increase effectiveness in sorrel harvesting,” the Ambassador said. The extension officers will participate in a demonstration exercise today on the proper use of the machine at the Bodles Research Station in St. Catherine.last_img read more

first_img The Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ) is reminding Jamaicans that energy conservation should still be the first priority, even as Jamaica launches into the oil and gas exploration industry.Speaking at a recent JIS ‘Think Tank’, Manager, Corporate Affairs and Communication at the PCJ, Camille Taylor, said the agency is encouraging persons to practise energy conservation and efficiency, which is now being called the ‘first fuel’.She explained that the company’s mandate in managing energy security for Jamaica is two tiered – looking at supply, which is the oil and gas exploration and development of renewables; and managing demand, which is the energy efficiency projects done in the public sector.For his part, Group General Manager at the PCJ, Winston Watson, pointed out that the agency is driving the energy management of the country from different areas.“Finding oil and gas is one solution, but the best solution we have is conservation, so we must still practise energy conservation…use it wisely,” he urged.Mr. Watson explained that in addition to oil and gas exploration, the PCJ does a number of energy conservation, energy efficiency and renewable energy projects.He noted that Wigton Wind Farm in Manchester is one such project, and is the largest of its kind in the Caribbean.In the meantime, the Group General Manager said that the PCJ is also working on implementing a programme with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the European Union (EU) to put energy solutions in hospitals, schools and Government agencies.Oil and gas exploration activities are being undertaken by the PCJ and Tullow Oil, and will move into a higher gear with the initiation of the first ever 3-D seismic survey in the waters off Jamaica’s south coast between the Pedro Bank and Portland Cottage this month.-30- The Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ) is reminding Jamaicans that energy conservation should still be the first priority, even as Jamaica launches into the oil and gas exploration industry.  “Finding oil and gas is one solution, but the best solution we have is conservation, so we must still practise energy conservation…use it wisely,” he urged. Story Highlights She explained that the company’s mandate in managing energy security for Jamaica is two tiered – looking at supply, which is the oil and gas exploration and development of renewables; and managing demand, which is the energy efficiency projects done in the public sector.last_img read more

first_imgToronto’s Men Fashion Week – TMFW LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With: David Dixon’s show is always a must-see event for fashion week in Toronto. The capsule collection for the made-in-Canada Piccadilly label he presented earlier this month at the Waterworks condos on Richmond St. was no exception. The designer, who has been in this notoriously tough business for 22 years, drew chic crowds and raves.But this wasn’t “fashion week,” at least not officially. The show was part of TW, the freshly baked acronym for Toronto Women’s Fashion Week, a new add-on to the end of TOM, the 3-year-old Toronto Men’s Fashion Week.Confused yet? It is a time of upheaval for fashion in this city. Four separate events, spread over six weeks, have vied to seize the spotlight for designers left in the lurch when the U.S.-based event-production giant IMG abruptly shuttered Toronto’s official show last summer, citing sponsorship woes. Advertisement Facebook Twitterlast_img read more