first_imgA copy of the Constitution hangs on the restroom door. The objects that adorn the walls run the gamut of time and place: a public health advisory sign from the city of New York parks and recreation department that warns pregnant women not to “eat fish or eels caught in these waters,” a boxed “crazy cat lady” action figure, a sombrero, a sign for Bianchi bicycles. Try to find a thread that runs through this decor, a unifying theme or a cumulative message, and you might just drive yourself crazy.Instead, appreciate the amalgamation for what it is: a fusion of crafted works of art and simple snapshots of reality. It is, at once, a space that displays creative outputs and reminds us of less-inspiring realities: a painting of a woman with blue hair on one side of the room and a copy of “Civil War Naval Chronology” on a bookshelf on the other. It is wonderfully alternative without trying so hard to be. It is as transcendent as it is grounded. By Jenna Moldaver |HIGHLANDS – “Water Witch is like this vortex,” said Valerie Browning, owner of Water Witch Coffee. “All these creative people just come toward it.”When waiting for your order at Water Witch Coffee, you won’t be at a loss for entertainment. Your eyes may drift across art-lined walls, fixating on vibrant pieces from artists across the country, or you might take a seat in a spindle-back chair and absorb the eclectic decor that encompasses you in your little corner of this inventive space on Waterwitch Avenue. Either way, there’s a lot to see, hear and experience. Browning, who has run the shop for four years, has grown Water Witch into a cultural hub. There are blues jams every third Sunday of the month, traditional Irish music jams every second and, most popularly, open mic night every Wednesdays. The music scene has given birth to groups like the Water Witch Jazz Band, which has used the space both to practice and perform.“It’s a welcoming atmosphere for people to come into as musicians and the place really fosters the growth of all the arts,” said Browning. “There’s this one woman who comes in who says, ‘Val, this place saves lives,’ ” Browning said. “Because without it they wouldn’t really have anywhere to go. There’s a Water Witch family. You can walk into the shop and find someone if you need help. Someone will know something about almost any topic.”When she’s having a bad day, Browning says the cure is simply going in to work, where customers fill the place with color. Customers have named menu items, jammed out on weeknights and grown to know the staff. They are more than patrons; they are participants. “We have a lot of regular customers who I see every day who have been coming here for 12 years,” says Browning. “Some are detectives, some have had computer engineering jobs and they show up at 6:30 every morning. If one doesn’t show up they end up calling the other ones.”Browning says she couldn’t begin to describe all the different people who come into the shop. “Highlands has a sort of quirkiness to it and it’s filling up with all sorts of people,” she said.One thing they all have in common, though, is they all care deeply about the shop and together they form what Browning calls the “Water Witch family.”center_img This article was first published in the June 14-June 21, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times. Water Witch has artists lined up well into next year to do art shows in the shop. Every two months a new artist takes over the walls of Water Witch, giving customers an ever-changing backdrop. Some artists have created entire shows just for the purpose of having their work displayed at the shop.“Every two months the customers have a whole new genre or idea of art,” says Browning.But not everyone who steps foot in the shop is buzzing with artistic talent. While a welcoming space for creative types, Water Witch is home base for a wide variety of locals. Water Witch Coffee is more than just savory paninis and espresso drinks; it’s a breath of pure authenticity in the Highlands community. It’s both a venue where musicians can perform during Wednesday open mic nights and a workspace for anyone with a laptop and a latte craving. You can use it for its authentic promotion of the arts or for its Wi-Fi and crepe offerings. The space is yours to experience.And experiencing it is exactly what people have done.last_img read more

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (April 8, 2016)–Makena, a rapidly improving 4-year-old filly by Pioneerof the Nile, made short work of six rivals on Friday at Santa Anita, winning the track’s $58,000 allowance feature under Drayden Van Dyke by 3 ¼ handy lengths. Trained by Scott Hansen and based at San Luis Rey Downs, Makena negotiated a flat mile in 1:35.98.Quick out of the gate from her number three post position, Makena sat a comfortable second just outside of favored Our First Girl throughout, prior to taking command at the quarter pole and won eased up in her second consecutive win.The second choice in the wagering at 9-5, Makena paid $5.60, $3.00 and $2.40. Owned by Gary Broad, she picked up $34,800 for the win, increasing her earnings to $102,120. A maiden special weight winner going a mile here on March 3, Makena’s overall mark now stands at 6-2-2-2.Ridden by Flavien Prat, Savannah Sky was attentive to the pace and finished second, 2 ¼ lengths in front of longshot Girl Downstairs. Off at 7-2, Savannah Sky paid $3.60 and $3.00.Like the top two finishers, Girl Downstairs, who was ridden by Martin Garcia, was attentive to the pace and was easily third-best, finishing 4 ¾ lengths in front of Our First Girl. Off at 18-1, Girl Downstairs paid $5.00 to show.Fractions on the race were 23.17, 47.01, 1:11.45 and 1:23.34.First post time for a 12-race program on Saturday, Santa Anita Derby Day, is at 12 noon. Admission gates open early on Derby Day at 10 a.m.last_img read more

first_imgTechnology firms and device manufacturers ABB, Bosch, Cisco, and LG aim have agreed to set up a smart home software platform consortium in Germany. The firms have signed a memorandum of understanding and, subject to antitrust approval, said they plan to develop an open architecture for data exchange that will allow different devices and services – ranging from security to entertainment – to exchange information with each other.The firms said that a common platform like this has not been available before now and that they aim to make different devices compatible with each other and able to communicate over WiFi and wired connections.“This consortium represents an opportunity to bring together a variety of business ecosystem partners, all working together to help make the ‘internet of things’ for the home a reality. Cisco is looking forward to participating in the consortium and creating a standard that allows consumers to experience a connected home,” said Jesper Andersen, senior vice president and general manager, Cisco Service Provider Video Software & Solutions Group.last_img read more

first_imgUK free-to-air satellite platform Freesat added 6,000 new TV homes in the third quarter, taking its total number of additions this year to 25,000 households.Announcing Q3 figures, Freesat said that more than 4 million viewers watch its service each week and that it continues to be the preferred TV offering for 1.9 million households.Freesat revealled that its connected service, Freetime, has seen 60% year-on-year growth, and that the Freesat App has been downloaded more than 550,000 times to iOS and Android devices.In the last quarter, Freesat also added six new channels to its lineup – including PBS America and Fox UK’s YourTV – taking its content offering to more than 200 TV and radio channels.“It’s been another busy quarter for Freesat and we’re pleased that six new channels see the value in joining the platform. The launch of Fox’s Your TV and PBS America on free-to-air for the first time only reinforces the strength of free TV in the UK,” said Freesat managing director, Alistair Thom.Freesat’s Freetime service is available on TVs and set top boxes and lets users pause, rewind and record live TV, scroll back through seven-days of catch-up programming and access on-demand players including BBC iPlayer, ITV Player, All4, Demand 5 and YouTube.last_img read more