first_imgKilling Osama(Pakistan) armed Forces and ISI are to blame for the incident (“Terroristan: Pak trapped in a web of deceit,” May 16) and there should be an accountability process for them as well. the Accountability never weakens an organisation but it only helps to indicate the flaws and weaknesses within,Killing Osama(Pakistan) armed Forces and ISI are to blame for the incident (“Terroristan: Pak trapped in a web of deceit,” May 16) and there should be an accountability process for them as well. the Accountability never weakens an organisation but it only helps to indicate the flaws and weaknesses within institutions. So one could say that it would only strengthen them.Anwer Abbas, Pakistan, via email I won’t be surprised if Osama has been captured alive, and is in the custody of the Americans. Only time will reveal the truth.Ravi Bedi, via email Imperialists have been after Pakistan for some time. They know (and we also know) very well that their ends cannot be achieved unless they weaken our strong, brave armed forces and isi. They have overcome our democratic set up, they have weakened us economically and they have divided us ethnically. This time- and perhaps this is the final chapter-they managed to land a final blow to the very existence of isi and the Pakistani armed forces.Nadeem Choudhry, Pakistan, via email The more America piles up lie after lie in the media, itself confused about how to respond to the challenges from different sections of the world, the crime of 9/11 gets more and more fuzzy, raising doubts about whether it was not an inside job, most audaciously imposed on Osama, al Qaeda and the rest of the Muslim world.Ghulam Muhammed, Mumbai Most leaders lead from the front, by example. The al Qaeda may have thought that their ascetic leader, Osama bin Laden, was running between caves, dodging drone attacks, braving bullets for their cause; in reality, he was well insulated from their mountainous tribulations. The rank and file of the al Qaeda must be dejected, now that they have a clear picture of the lifestyle of their leader over the past five-six years in Pakistan.Raju Aneja, Dubaiadvertisement Domestic travelInstead of travelling to Dubai or other international cities (“Hi, Dubai,” May 16) our high-flying politicians should visit places in India itself and promote tourism in our country, as well as boost the economy.R.K. Singh, DelhiSmart ChangeK.V. Kamath, with his vast experience, will be an able chairman of Infosys (“Infy Starts a New Chapter,” May 16). Though he may not deal much with operations, he will be an asset.Ravi Singh, via www.intoday.inSports Sans PoliticsApropos “Keep politicians out of sports”, May 16, finally someone of Kapil Dev’s stature has rightly observed the drawbacks in our sports administration. The standards of Indian sports could have been much higher if it was free of political influence. These politicians know nothing about sports, yet are put at the helm of sports affairs resulting in pathetic standards.Lt Col (Retd) Ranjit Sinha, Kolkata Politicians should be kept out of sports. Every important sports federation has a politician at its head. Only when we change the system will the sporting culture in our country improve.H. Hamid, via www.intoday.in Politicians have too much control over things that are important in our country. How would they feel if Sachin Tendulkar wanted to be the prime minister or Vijender Singh wanted to be chief minister of Haryana? It’s high time the system is changed.S.N. Pathak, New Delhi Control Price HikeIt looks like there is a need for another mass uprising under Anna Hazare to draw the Government’s attention to the phenomenal rise in the price of jowar, which is a staple food for the poorer sections of Maharashtra (“After Onions, it’s Jowar”, May 16). Government should take corrective measures to control the price of Jowar immediately.Ranjit Sinha, Kolkata Whenever there is a hike in prices of essential commodities, it is the common man who suffers. Politicians, who make all sorts of promises during elections, should be hauled up for the hardship that people have to endure.Subhash Arora, Delhi End of an Era”Just not my type”, May 16, touched just the right key of my heart. The article and the typewriter are just my type. I read india today for articles like this, which portray the common man’s struggle to eke out a living, rather than the Osamas and Obamas. Like all good things, the good old days of typewriters have come to an end. Let’s hope future generations get to see some well-preserved typewriters in museums.Bhushan Jindal, Jalandhar Forced conversionsYour article (“Freelancers of God”, May 9) establishes a direct relation between the foreign funds pouring into the country and the rate of conversions. Hindus, Muslims and mainstream Christians must unite to throw these “poachers” and “business” evangelists out of the country and stop their flow of funds.Atul Marathe, via emailadvertisementNo hope for Air IndiaThe present set-up does not raise any hope for this company (“Sell Air India while there is still a buyer,” May 16). The people running (read many in management and Board) the organisation have no business being there. Most of them are either openly corrupt, or are involved in it indirectly through their cohorts.Parvat Nanda, via email The recent pilots’ strike has once again brought into focus the state of our public sector enterprises. An Air India board member has suggested the patient is already suffering from cancer. With cancer only surgery works, not homeopathy or aruyveda. It may even be better to shut down the airline during the time it takes for such a surgical solution rather than incur a loss of Rs 57 crore every day. Dr Rajiv Kumar, Delhilast_img read more

first_imgLandon Donovan and Clint Dempsey will be crucial for USA at the World CupFor the first time since 1990, the United States heads to the biggest football tournament on the planet with no central defenders with World Cup experience.The reformed defense appears to be as shaky this year as it was in 2010, and offensive leaders Landon Donovan and Clint Dempsey have struggled with their form recently.Michael Bradley, son of former coach Bob Bradley, has become the key figure in the American player pool, which has seen an infusion of German-Americans under Bob Bradley’s successor, Jurgen Klinsmann.Here are five players to watch:TIM HOWARDTim Howard is having perhaps his best season for Everton.The 35-year-old goalkeeper, preparing for his second World Cup as the No. 1 choice, will be counted on to blunt the attack of talented opponents such as Cristiano Ronaldo and Mario Gomez.LANDON DONOVANGetting ready for his fourth World Cup at 32, can Landon Donovan provide the spark that helped the Americans reach the 2002 quarterfinals and the second round in 2010, especially after his lengthy sabbatical in 2012-13?CLINT DEMPSEYClint Dempsey, now 31, has struggled for goals for the past year with Tottenham and Seattle, but as United States captain provided a steady presence in qualifying.Will coach Jurgen Klinsmann use him in midfield or as a withdrawn striker?MICHAEL BRADLEYThe son of former United States coach Bob Bradley, 26-year-old midfielder Michael Bradley has become the most influential player on the national team.Will his January transfer from Roma to Toronto cause a drop in sharpness?advertisementJOZY ALTIDOREStill only 24, Jozy Altidore seemed to have his breakout season in 2012-13 when he scored 31 goals in 41 matches for AZ Alkmaar in the Dutch league.But Altidore had only two goals in his first 33 games this season for Sunderland, leading some to question whether he can lead the American attack.last_img read more