first_imgCrescent City >> The Arcata Tigers and McKinleyville Panthers opened the 2016 Humboldt-Del Norte Conference cross country season in impressive fashion Wednesday afternoon at Del Norte Golf Course.The Tigers swept both the boys and girls individual titles — with Kellen O’Neill winning the boys race with a time of 15 minutes, nine seconds and Riley Martel-Phillips taking the girls race with a time of 18:30. Martel-Phillips also led the Arcata girls to a team victory as the Tigers placed three …last_img read more

first_imgThe upshot on range constraintsFor people to overcome range anxiety and feel comfortable buying an electric vehicle, they need to know their needs will be met on all days, including high-energy days. Predicting when this will occur — and in advance when buying a vehicle on how many days this will occur — is something that our model is well-suited for.Our model can, with limited input on travel distance, time and location, predict the probability of exceeding the car’s range, and point to days where drivers need to turn to other, longer-range cars, for example, within households, or even within communities and through commercial car-sharing programs. The results also shed light on the quantity of long-range cars that would be needed at the population level, a gap to be filled by private sector innovation as well as national and local policy.Reasonable financing to help distribute the upfront costs over the car’s lifetime and increasing the opportunities for charging, even if only once daily, would also encourage EV adoption.In all, our analysis shows that current electric vehicles can meet most daily driving needs in the U.S. Improved access to shared, long-range transport, alongside further-advanced batteries and cars and decarbonized electricity, provides a pathway to reaching a largely decarbonized personal vehicle fleet. It’s Time to Plan for Electric Vehicles on the GridThe Downside of Low Gas PricesMinnesota OKs Special Rates for Electric VehiclesPlan for California Vehicle Charging Stations on HoldElectric Vehicles Hit a Pothole in California As Electric Cars Stall, A Move to Greener Trucks and BusesAfter Lithium-Ion, What?Beyond Sprawl: The Solar Suburbs of the FutureRunning Our House on Prius PowerCan We Power Our Car With the Sun?New Life for Old Electric Vehicle Batteries A California Utility Looks for New Answers in Solar Integration Puzzle Jessika E. Trancik is an associate professor in energy studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This column was originally published at The Conversation. To realize this potential, however, the needs of prospective electric vehicle drivers have to be met on all days, even high-energy ones, such as days that require long-distance travel.Two key innovations can enable this. The first is to predict the days on which drivers are likely to exceed the car’s range, which our model is designed to do. And the second is institutional or business-model innovation to provide alternative long-range vehicles on those high-energy days. For example, conventional cars, and eventually low-carbon, long-range alternatives, might show up at a user’s door at the click of a button. This need may last for some time even as battery technology improves and charging infrastructure expands. Vehicle range is not a single numberAn electric vehicle’s range is typically thought of in terms of a fixed number, but the number of miles covered on a single charge changes with factors including driving speed, driving style, and outdoor temperature. To understand the range of a car, we need to look beyond the car itself to how people are behaving.Over the last four years in my research group, we’ve built a model (called “TripEnergy”) of the second-by-second driving behavior of people across the United States, how they are likely to use heating and cooling systems in their cars, and how various electric and conventional vehicles would consume energy if driven in this way.This approach gives us a probabilistic view of electric vehicle range. For example, for the Nissan Leaf, we find that 74 miles is the median range — based on driving patterns, half of the cars on the road in the U.S. would be able to travel this far, and half would not. (A Ford Focus electric performs similarly.) There is a distribution in this range, which demonstrates how widely actual performance can vary. We estimate, for instance, that 5% of 58-mile trips could not be covered on one charge, and 5% of 90-mile trips could. RELATED ARTICLES By JESSIKA TRANCIKElectrifying transportation is one of the most promising ways to significantly cut greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles, but so-called range anxiety — concern about being stranded with an uncharged car battery — remains a barrier to electric vehicle adoption. Is range anxiety justified given current cars and charging infrastructure?It’s a question my research group and I addressed in a paper published in Nature Energy, by taking a close look at this problem with a new model.Specifically, we asked: When looking down on the geographic area of the U.S. from a bird’s-eye view, how many personal vehicles on the road daily could be replaced with a low-cost battery electric vehicle (EV), even if daytime charging isn’t available? Our analysis is, to our knowledge, the most expansive yet detailed study to date of how current and future-improved electric vehicle technology measures up to people’s energy-consuming behavior.We found nearly 90% of vehicles on the road could be replaced by a low-cost electric vehicle available on the market today. What’s more, this number is remarkably similar across very different cities, from New York to Houston to Los Angeles. That is, there is a high potential for electrification of cars in both dense and more sprawling cities in the United States. Returns on technology improvementWhat if batteries improve, and allow for longer driving range for the same cost as current-generation lithium ion batteries?The 2015 Chevrolet Bolt EV concept vehicle, which is expected to sell for about $30,000 when it goes into production later this year. (Photo: General Motors)The federal research agency ARPA-E has set a target for batteries to store roughly two times more energy by weight than today’s batteries in electric vehicles. If that technical target is reached, we estimate that the 87% daily adoption potential estimate would rise to 98%, and the gasoline substitution potential would rise from 61% to 88%. The 2017 Chevy Bolt and 2018 Tesla Model 3 are expected to achieve roughly similar increases in potentials at an increased cost compared to today’s Nissan Leaf, though these costs are still close to the average cost of new cars. The Tesla Model S travels even further but costs significantly more.Even with substantial battery improvements, however, other types of powertrain technologies will be needed to cover those days with the highest energy consumption. This need may persist for some time, even with expanded charging infrastructure, due to a small number of very high-energy days. Evaluating electric vehicle technology against driving behaviorWith the TripEnergy model in hand, we asked how many cars on the road could be replaced with a low-cost electric vehicle available today. We considered a case where drivers can charge only once daily: for example, at home overnight. This allowed us to study a situation where only limited changes are needed to existing public charging infrastructure and cars can use power plants that would otherwise sit idle overnight.We found that, given how people are driving across the U.S., 87% of cars on an average day could be replaced with a current-generation, low-cost electric vehicle, with only once-daily charging. This is based on the driving behavior of millions of people across the U.S. across diverse cities and socioeconomic classes.Switching from conventional to electric vehicles for those cars would cut emissions by an estimated 30%, even with today’s fossil fuel-based supply mix. In total, the trips taken by those cars represent roughly 60% of gasoline consumption in the U.S.This large daily adoption potential is remarkably similar across both dense and more sprawling U.S. cities, ranging from 84% to 93%.While it’s true that people behave differently across cities — in how they use public transport, whether they own a car, and how often they drive the cars they own — when they do drive, we found that a similar number of cars in different cities fall within the range provided by a low-cost electric vehicle.last_img read more

first_imgThe Uttar Pradesh government on Sunday shunted out the District Magistrate and the Superintendent of Police of Sonbhadra, besides ordering action against 13 other officials after they were indicted in an inquiry into the killing of 10 Gond tribals last month over a land dispute.‘FIRs against guilty’ Addressing a press conference at his residence, Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath said FIRs will be registered against several police and administration officials for alleged irregularities and members of the Adarsh Krishi Sahkari Samiti, Umbha, on charges of land grabbing. The disputed land in Umbha and Saphi villages will also be transferred back and registered in the name of the gram sabha, he said, while announcing that a Special Investigation Team will look into the matter. Mr. Adityanath said departmental proceedings have been initiated against Sonbhadra District Magistrate Ankit Kumar Agrawal and Superintendent of Police Salman Taj Patil for taking “one-sided decision” against the villagers. Directives have been issued to attach Mr. Agrawal and Mr. Patil to the Personnel Department and the DGP Headquarters, respectively, he said. S. Ramalingam has been made the new District Magistrate of Sonbhadra, while Prabhakar Chaudhary is the new Superintendent of Police, officials said. “The entire matter will be probed by an SIT. The SIT will be headed by DIG SIT J. Ravindra Gaud and will have Additional SP Amrita Mishra along with three inspectors. DG SIT R.P. Singh will be monitoring the work of the SIT,” the Chief Minister said. He said another team will be set up under Additional Chief Secretary (Revenue) Renuka Kumar to look into the issue of land grabbing by “fake” societies in the last 60-70 years in Mirzapur and Sonbhadra.‘No action on report’ “Fake societies in Sonbhadra and Mirzapur have grabbed more than one lakh acre of land. In 1972, the then Chief Minister Hemwati Nandan Bahuguna had constituted a probe committee under Mangaldev Visharad. However, no action was taken as a number of Congress leaders were involved,” Mr. Adityanath said.last_img read more

first_imgThere could be more trouble for News Corp owner Rupert Murdoch as the fallout of the hacking scandal escalates. Shares of News Corp tumbled by over 7 per cent on the Australian Stock Exchange on Monday, as the phone-hacking scandal in the UK widened. Eighty-year-old Murdoch, his son James, who is the chairman of News Corp’s British arm News International, and former News International CEO Rebekah Brooks will be questioned by a British parliamentary comittee on Tuesday.  They are likely to face angry questions from politicians about suspicions that Britain’s parliament was misled over allegations of phone hacking by one of Murdoch’s newspapers. The 10-member panel of politicians on the Culture, Media and Sport committee would focus on James Murdoch’s admission that parliament was misled over the hacking allegations. The Murdochs had initially declined to appear at the British parliamentary hearing, but later changed their minds amid escalating political and public condemnation of suspected media abuses at the News of the World tabloid. News International had previously pinned the blame for phone-hacking crimes on a single rogue reporter, who was convicted in 2007.last_img read more