first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Energy Voice:Statoil has made a slight but incredibly significant change to its brand. It starts the year as a “energy company” leaving its “oil company” persona behind.Energy Voice exclusively sat down with chief executive Eldar Sætre to discuss the shift in strategy. “The future is going to be low carbon. It has to be,” he said.“Our industry must be involved in this. The sector is an important part of the problem and the solution, when it comes to a low carbon future, so we have to take responsibility. But we also have to translate this into what are the implications and opportunities from a business perspective. This is something that is happening and the industry must be part of this. I’ve made a choice – we don’t see this as a problem.“Our renewables business has been even more integrated into our existing business, so we define ourselves firmly as an energy company,” Sætre said. “We do oil and gas, but we are an energy company. Renewables is not something we do on the side.“We have indicated we might spend between 15% to 20% of our capital expenditure by 2030 for renewables and we also indicated the type of returns we expect, because that’s important for our shareholders. They need to see returns. We’re talking about a 9% to 11% rate of return on these types of investments.”More: Exclusive: Statoil CEO Eldar Sætre on the industry’s “energy transition On the Blogs: Statoil CEO Embraces Renewables, Low-Carbon Energy Futurelast_img read more

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):RWE AG was the major winner in Germany’s first tender for shutting down hard coal-fired power plants, taking two-thirds of the compensation handed out by the government, as strong competition elsewhere drove average prices down to well below the maximum available.RWE and Vattenfall AB both secured contracts for closing two power plants each, while Uniper SE successfully bid one of its assets, according to results published Dec. 1 by Germany’s grid regulator, BNetzA.The auction was meant to secure the shutdown of 4,000 MW of hard coal capacity, but ended up awarding contracts to 4,788 MW, spread across 11 power plants. It was the first in a series of seven rounds that are supposed to whittle down a fleet of about 23,000 MW of hard coal plants still online in Germany. The country wants to phase out all coal generation by 2038.The first tender was significantly oversubscribed, BNetzA said, resulting in a volume-weighted average of just €66,259/MW — significantly below the €165,000/MW ceiling. Individual awards ranged from €6,047/MW to €150,000/MW.Overall, the low compensation bids are a sign of the unattractive economics of running coal power plants in Germany, after a year that saw production idled amid low demand caused by the lockdown. Coal operators have also had to contend with competition from cheap gas and high CO2 prices under the EU’s Emissions Trading System.In the first round, RWE was successful with its 764-MW Westfalen and 794-MW Ibbenbüren plants, while Vattenfall successfully bid the two blocks of its Hamburg Moorburg plant, which have a combined capacity of 1,600 MW. Although the mechanism is designed to prioritize the shutdown of plants with higher emissions, the awards include some of Germany’s most modern hard coal units: Moorburg has only been online since 2015 and RWE’s Westfalen went into operation in 2014.[Yannic Rack]More ($): RWE nets bulk of compensation in Germany’s first tender for coal plant closures First German coal closure auction oversubscribed as utilities look to exit uneconomic sectorlast_img read more