VANCOUVER — The National Energy Board must reconsider whether a proposed natural gas pipeline critical to the development of the Pacific NorthWest liquefied natural gas project falls within provincial or federal jurisdiction, the Federal Court of Appeal has ruled.The judgment marks a setback for the $36-billion LNG development, which secured conditional approval from the federal government last year.“The board did not ask itself whether an arguable case for federal jurisdiction had been made out,” wrote Justice Donald J. Rennie in his decision Wednesday in response to a proceeding launched by Michael Sawyer, who received funding support from the SkeenaWild Conservation Trust.Sawyer argued the Prince Rupert Gas Transmission Project, a roughly 900-kilometre pipeline from Hudson’s Hope, B.C., to a natural gas terminal on the province’s Lelu Island, required federal and not provincial approvals.The province has green-lighted the pipeline project proposed by TransCanada Corp. (TSX:TRP). But the overall venture is still waiting for a final commitment from Pacific NorthWest LNG, which would build and operate the $11-billion facility on Lelu Island, if it proceeds.Pacific NorthWest LNG, whose majority owner is Malaysia-based Petronas, could not be reached for comment. On its website, it says it is conducting an internal review of the project and will then table it to shareholders for a final investment decision.Prior to launching the case, Sawyer had filed an application to the NEB asking it to hold a hearing to determine what jurisdiction the pipeline project falls under. He argued that while the pipeline’s route falls fully within the province, it would ship gas destined to be exported to markets overseas, and therefore should be under federal jurisdiction.The NEB rejected his application, but now must reconsider it due to Rennie’s ruling.“The board is reviewing the court decision and will consider next steps after doing so,” NEB spokesman James Stevenson said Thursday in an email.TransCanada has 60 days to apply for leave to appeal. Spokesman Matthew John said in an email that the company is still reviewing the ruling and considering its options.“It is notable that this decision is not a determination that federal jurisdiction applies,” he said, adding that the NEB only needs to reconsider Sawyer’s case.Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter. read more

OSU coach Urban Meyer addresses the media during the 2016 Big Ten Media Days in Chicago. Credit: Courtesy of Jacob Myers| Assistant Sports EditorOhio State football coach Urban Meyer is going to address and take questions from the media for the first time all summer Monday. With the start of the football season about a month away, there are several topics of interest Meyer will likely discuss in Chicago at Big Ten Media Days. 1. Cornerback Depth ChartThe 2017 NFL Draft did not siphon as much Ohio State talent as the prior year’s draft, but it took its tole on the school’s cornerback depth. During the first round alone, both starting cornerbacks — Gareon Conley and Marshon Lattimore — were taken. Fortunately for the Buckeyes, however, cornerback might remain one of the deepest positions on the team. Junior Denzel Ward and redshirt sophomores Kendall Sheffield and Damon Arnette stand out as the early three favorites to see the most playing time, as well as a talented quartet of freshmen in Shaun Wade, Jeffrey Okudah, Marcus Williamson and Amir Riep. 2. Sam Hubbard at linebacker?No position is as deep for the Buckeyes as defensive end. With sophomore Nick Bosa, senior Jalyn Holmes, redshirt senior Tyquan Lewis — reigning Big Ten Defensive Lineman of the Year — and redshirt junior Sam Hubbard the biggest challenge for Meyer at the position could just be finding playing time for all four linemen.And while the notion of running four defensive ends with just a lone defensive tackle has been mentioned, so too was the possibility of shifting Hubbard to the linebacker position. Hubbard — who originally came to the Buckeyes as a safety — has played exclusively at defensive end throughout his college career and has the size and athleticism for the position. However, the coaches have long praised his speed and versatility, making the prospect of Hubbard moving over to the linebacker position seems possible. 3. Competition at H-backWhen Curtis Samuel declared early for the NFL Draft, a void in the Ohio State offense immediately appeared. Samuel, the team’s leading receiver from a season ago, has been the team’s starting H-back the past two seasons, assisting the Buckeye offense in both the passing game as well as the rushing game. So, who will fill that void for the Buckeyes?The early favorite at the position has been redshirt senior wide receiver Parris Campbell. Campbell finished last season with 121 receiving yards on 13 receptions. He also tallied 54 yards on the ground on four carries, with a touchdown. In addition to Campbell, sophomore running back Demario McCall could be viewed as the man to fill the vacant slot, as he demonstrated both his potential to run the ball effectively in the spring game (83 yards on six carries) as well as impact the passing game, as he caught a 40-yard touchdown pass and totaled 48 receiving yards in the game. 4. Progress of passing game under WilsonA focal point for fan criticism over the past few seasons, Ohio State’s passing game has not been the near-juggernaut it was back in 2014. But bringing in a new offensive coordinator — Kevin Wilson — who has led arguably the best passing game in the Big Ten over the past six seasons, Meyer could be on the cusp of turning the team’s fortunes in that area around.At the spring game, fans got a chance to see wideouts like redshirt junior Johnnie Dixon, redshirt junior Terry McLaurin and redshirt sophomore K.J. Hill catch deep ball after deep ball, and rack up gaudy passing yard totals. Sure, it was just a spring game, but it was a sight that fans of the team haven’t seen since the national-championship winning season in 2014. The Buckeyes have had a potent rushing attack the past several seasons, but if Wilson can get the air game back to where it had been a few seasons ago, the Ohio State offense could silence all of its critics. 5. KickerLast season, redshirt-junior Sean Nuernberger was expected to win the kicker duties after finishing the 2015 position as the starter in a battle with transfer Jack Willoughby. But a groin injury to Nuernberger left Tyler Durbin as the starter, who finished the year 63-for-65 in extra-point attempts and 17-for-22 in field goal attempts. Now Durbin is gone, and Nuernberger is in the same position he was in after the 2015 season: wondering if he will enter the year as the starter or be again reduced to the backup spot.The Buckeyes currently have three kickers on the roster who have been battling it out for the starting spot this summer. Along with Nuernberger, Ohio State also has freshman Blake Haubeil on its team. Meyer may shed light on the ongoing battle at the kicker spot in Chicago. read more