first_imgSan Francisco: Tech giants Apple and Samsung have been sued in the US over harmful radio frequency (RF) exposure their smartphones may be emitting. The class-action suit, filed in the US District Court for the Northern District of California, claims RF radiation emitted from Apple and Samsung smartphones “exceed legal limits set forth by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)”, Apple Insider reported on Saturday. The devices mentioned in the suit are Apple’s iPhone 7 Plus, iPhone 8 and iPhone X, and Samsung’s Galaxy S8 and Galaxy Note8. Also Read – Swiggy now in 500 Indian cities, targets 100 more this year A separate investigation by Chicago Tribune also found that “radio-frequency radiation exposure from the iPhone 7 measured over the legal safety limit and more than double against what Apple had reported to federal regulators from its own testing”. “Numerous recent scientific publications, supported by hundreds of scientists worldwide, have shown that RF radiation exposure affects living organisms at levels well below most international and national guidelines,” read the court filing. Also Read – New HP Pavilion x360 notebook with in-built Alexa in India “Effects include increased cancer risk, cellular stress, increase in harmful free radicals, genetic damages, structural and functional changes of the reproductive system, learning and memory deficits, neurological disorders and negative impacts on general well-being in humans,” the lawsuit elaborated. There is confusion about the meaning of the maximum reported Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) values for cell phones (and other wireless devices). SAR is a measure of the rate of RF energy absorption by the body from the source being measured – in this case, a cell phone, said FCC guidelines. “Many people mistakenly assume that using a cell phone with a lower reported SAR value necessarily decreases a user’s exposure to RF emissions, or is somehow ‘safer’ than using a cell phone with a high SAR value,” the FCC said. The FCC set the safety limit at 1.6 watts per kilogram (1.6W/kg), averaged over 1 gram of tissue. Plaintiffs argued that Apple “covered up any risks by misrepresenting the safety of the smartphones”. Earlier, Apple had declared RF exposure information, including Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), but “the company stopped furnishing such information with the release of the iPhone 7”, they argued. According to Apple, “all iPhone models, including iPhone 7, are fully certified by the FCC and in every other country where iPhone is sold”. “We are in compliance and meet all applicable exposure guidelines and limits,” said Apple. However, Samsung was yet to react to the developments.last_img read more

first_imgAll Schools/ General Public ThursdaySeptember 29thYouth Got TalentTalent Show7 pmLibrary Tennis Court Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Talent/Culture Night YOUTH WEEK 2016 – SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES – North/Middle Caicos DateEventDescriptionVenue & TimeParticipants FridaySeptember 30thFoot Steps For Good Charity Walk (Provo)Charity WalkFrom Clement Howell High to National StadiumClement Howell High to National Stadium7 amAll Schools/ General Public Raymond Gardiner High School WednesdaySeptember 28th WednesdaySeptember 28th Arts and Culture DayDisplay of arts and culture and games4:30pmNK Francis Park TuesdaySeptember 27thIsland Treasure HuntIsland Treasure HuntParade Ground5PM Friday30th September 2016 All Schools/ General Public TuesdaySeptember 27thInter- Primary Speech CompetitionEach school will have two contestants for our Quiz Competition.  Two schools will advance to the championship roundVenue TBA10am MondaySeptember 26thDevotions WednesdaySeptember 28th Events For National Youth Week DateEventDescriptionVenue & TimeParticipants All Schools/ General Public Jazz In the GardenJazz performances by schools from around islandsNational Stadium4PMAll Schools/ General Public All Schools/ General Public All Schools/ General Public Friday30th September 2016Jazz In the GardenJazz performances by schools from around islandsNational Stadium4PMAll Schools/ General Public PDM re-launches radio show for Youth Week All Schools/ General Public HJ Robinson HighHJ Robinson High A Taste of TCIForum on the evolution of Art and culture in TCI with sampling of locally made dishescenter_img Related Items:akierre missick speaks of national youth week, celebrating art and culture in the TCI, national youth week, national youth week 26th-30th of September MondaySeptember 26thDevotionsDevotions with all schools to commemorate Youth DayMethodist Church9:00amAll Schools/ General Public Culture event promoting TCI heritageVenue TBA7PM SundaySeptember 25thNational Youth Day Service Church ServiceChurch Service to  commemorate Youth DayHJ Robinson Parade Ground Youth Parliament Launched; Looking for Passionate people Cultural ConcertCulture event promoting TCI heritageRegatta Village7PM MondaySeptember 25thDevotionsDevotions to  commemorate Youth DayClement Howell High8:40amClement Howell High YOUTH WEEK 2016 – SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES – PROVIDENCIALES YOUTH WEEK 2016 – SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES – GRAND TURK All Schools/ General Public WednesdaySeptember 28th YOUTH WEEK 2016 – SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES – SOUTH CAICOS ThursdaySeptember 29thInter- house Speech CompetitionEach house will have 2 contestants for the competition.  There will be the winning house, and the best speaker award.Venue TBA10am TuesdaySeptember 27thSpeech CompetitionSpeech CompetitionOna Glinton Primary10am All Schools/ General Public Recommended for you DateEventDescriptionVenue & TimeParticipants TuesdaySeptember 27th Students/ General Public All Schools/ General Public Gustavus Sports Complex10am Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, September 23, 2016 – In keeping with the United Nations International Youth Day; The Department of Youth Affairs is please to celebrate National Youth Week 2016 under the theme “Celebrating Art and Culture in TCI” during  26th-30th September 2016.  National Youth Week events are scheduled for all the islands at both Primary and High school level. There will be speech competitions on North Caicos and Grand Turk, a culturally themed island treasure hunt on South Caicos as well as local youth artist performances throughout.All highlighted by the Jazz in the Garden themed concert on Friday 30th September 2016 which will showcase the talents of schools from around the islands at the National Stadium on Providenciales.Deputy Premier and Minister for Education, Youth, Sports and Library Services, Hon. Akierra Missick stated; “This year’s events are centered on allowing young people to express themselves through the various arts.   This outlet is an opportunity to demonstrate both cultural and personal identity while also learning of the importance of preserving Turks & Caicos Islands long and storied cultural background.” Arts ExhibitionDisplay of arts and craft by local artistProvo Public Library12 pm Friday30th September 2016Jazz In the GardenJazz performances by schools from around islandsNational Stadium4PMAll Schools/ General Public Friday30th September 2016Jazz In the GardenJazz performances by schools from around islandsNational Stadium4PMAll Schools/ General Public MondaySeptember 26thInter- Primary SchoolGeneral DevotionAll Primary schools will combine for devotionsVenue TBA8:40amAll Schools/ General Publiclast_img read more

first_imgFleet Science Center opens new interactive exhibit Pause-Play KUSI Newsroom, February 15, 2019 Posted: February 15, 2019 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI)- The Fleet Science Center has opened a new innovative exhibit called “pause-play”. It allows the young and young at heart to pause from their phones and other technological gadgets to actually play.KUSI’s Allie Wagner got a chance to experience what the new exhibit has to offer. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom last_img read more

first_img © 2017 Phys.org (Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in South Africa has found that African penguins sometimes work together to corral fish to allow for more efficient foraging. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes how they studied the birds, what they found and why they believe the penguins might go extinct if something does not change soon. Citation: African penguins found to work together to corral fish for foraging (2017, September 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-09-african-penguins-corral-fish-foraging.html Credit: CC0 Public Domain Emperor penguins use sea ice to rest between long foraging periods Journal information: Royal Society Open Sciencecenter_img Explore further More information: Alistair M. McInnes et al. Group foraging increases foraging efficiency in a piscivorous diver, the African penguin, Royal Society Open Science (2017). DOI: 10.1098/rsos.170918AbstractMarine piscivores have evolved a variety of morphological and behavioural adaptations, including group foraging, to optimize foraging efficiency when targeting shoaling fish. For penguins that are known to associate at sea and feed on these prey resources, there is nonetheless a lack of empirical evidence to support improved foraging efficiency when foraging with conspecifics. We examined the hunting strategies and foraging performance of breeding African penguins equipped with animal-borne video recorders. Individuals pursued both solitary as well as schooling pelagic fish, and demonstrated independent as well as group foraging behaviour. The most profitable foraging involved herding of fish schools upwards during the ascent phase of a dive where most catches constituted depolarized fish. Catch-per-unit-effort was significantly improved when targeting fish schools as opposed to single fish, especially when foraging in groups. In contrast to more generalist penguin species, African penguins appear to have evolved specialist hunting strategies closely linked to their primary reliance on schooling pelagic fish. The specialist nature of the observed hunting strategies further limits the survival potential of this species if Allee effects reduce group size-related foraging efficiency. This is likely to be exacerbated by diminishing fish stocks due to resource competition and environmental change. African penguins live off the southern coast of Africa. Like other penguins, they survive by eating small fish—in this cased, their diet is generally sardines and anchovies. But the African penguins have also been found to engage in a fishing behavior that has never been seen in penguins before—group coordinated foraging.Noting that the African penguin population has been dwindling due to diminished ocean fisheries over the past several decades, the researchers decided to take a closer look at their feeding habits. They affixed miniature cameras to the backs of 12 of the birds and used the data to create video for review. In all, the team amassed 14 hours of video, which revealed a lot about the life of the penguins.In addition to footage showing the penguins preening, there was also evidence of how they fished. The researchers report that the birds did their foraging alone approximately 66 percent of the time—the other 33 percent of the time, they worked together as a cohesive unit to usher fish into columns and then into balls. Dolphins have been seen doing the same on many occasions, but this was the first time it has been seen in penguins. Corralling the fish into a ball allows for easier foraging. In watching the video footage, researchers were able to compare the efficiency of fishing alone versus fishing with a group, and found that when the birds fished together, they were more than twice as efficient. The team also found evidence of the birds communicating prior to collaborative foraging, suggesting they planned their assault on their prey.The researchers note that the population of African penguins has dropped from 4 or 5 million two centuries ago to just 50,000 today, which possibly explains why they coordinate their foraging so seldom despite the near guarantee of more food—there are not always enough of them around to form a large enough group. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more