Welcome to this week’s episode of Hot Takedown, our podcast where the hot sports takes of the week meet the numbers that prove them right or tear them down. On this week’s show (June 30, 2015), we discuss the U.S. women’s national soccer team lineup, preview Wimbledon and discuss the weirdness of NBA free agency. Plus, our Significant Digit of the week: Luke Ridnour was traded this week for the fourth time this offseason, to the Toronto Raptors.Stream the episode by clicking the play button, or subscribe using one of the podcast clients we’ve linked to above.Below are some links to what we discuss on this week’s show:Allison McCann on the greatest Women’s World Cup game of all time.Andy Murray defending his coach ahead of Wimbledon.A full list of NBA free agents.Significant Digit: Luke Ridnour, the man that no team, and every team, wants. Hot Takedown More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS If you’re a fan of our podcasts, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave a rating/review. That helps spread the word to other listeners. And get in touch by email, on Twitter or in the comments. Tell us what you think, send us hot takes to discuss and tell us why we’re wrong. read more

OSU center Pat Elflein (65) looks across the line of scrimmage during the second half against Indiana on Oct. 8. The Buckeyes won 38-17. Credit: Mason Swires | Assistant Photo EditorLast Saturday, Ohio State struggled in pass protection with a team that averaged just a half sack a game in Michigan State. Buckeyes’ quarterback J.T. Barrett was hurried three times, and hurried seven of his passes. Barrett, who threw for just 86 yards against the Spartans, has taken a high level of abuse in recent weeks, carrying the ball 35 times in the last two weeks, on top of being sacked. This year, OSU has allowed its quarterbacks to be dropped in the backfield 17 times through 11 games.Although OSU has given up over a sack a game, Michigan’s defensive line is a different kind of beast with pass rushing. On defense, the Wolverines have 36 sacks, more than the team had all last season, including bowl games.The tendency of quarterbacks to be injured by the Michigan defense this season has been noted by coaches from Jim Harbaugh’s staff. So far, five opposing starters have been knocked out of games with injuries when playing against the Maize and Blue. When asked about the topic, Michigan junior defensive end Chase Winovich said it is never something that teams take pride in, but it’s just a matter of fact when playing a sport as physical as football. After Maryland starter Perry Hills hurt his shoulder against the Wolverines, Winovich was unapologetic in his answer to why so many quarterbacks have been injured against his team.“It’s a violent game,” he said. “Nobody makes it out alive. Nobody’s safe in this game, especially if you’re playing quarterback against us. We’re coming.”While Winovich did express his desire for a quick recovery by Hills, the message was clear. Michigan pulls no punches when hitting opposing signal callers. OSU players were asked about the strange statistic on Monday at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center. Adding to an already heated rivalry with serious playoff implications, many members of the team did not seem pleased with the comments made by the Michigan defensive end.Among them was redshirt junior guard Billy Price. Cooler heads prevailed for Price, who said he understood the tall order of keeping Barrett off the long list of injured starter“If you have a defensive line making a statement like that, that’s a challenge,” Price said. “We look forward to getting after it and protecting J.T.”Historically, the battle up front between Michigan and OSU has determined the outcome. The last time the Wolverines topped the Buckeyes, then-OSU quarterback Braxton Miller was dropped four times. Without time to pass, the Buckeyes could be in for a long game. Although OSU’s offensive attack depends mostly on running the ball and wearing down a defense, Michigan is allowing just 108 yards rushing per game to opponents.Even more frightening, Michigan has given up just four rushing touchdowns this season, one of the lowest marks in the entire NCAA. Redshirt senior center Pat Elflein has been pitted against the Wolverines before, and has witnessed firsthand the physicality of the trenches in The Game. OSU has faced more than one stout defensive front this season, but Saturday will be the ultimate test.Even with a formidable defense wanting nothing more than to drag Barrett down in the backfield, Elflein remains confident in his unit’s ability to dictate the outcome and is unaffected by the comments made by Winovich.“I know they’re a good defensive line,” he said. “We’ve faced good defensive lines this year and I don’t really care about any (talk) because we are going to do our job and we’re going to run the ball and protect our quarterback.”Elflein and Price will get their chance to back their claims on Saturday in Ohio Stadium against Michigan. Kickoff is set for noon. read more

first_imgWomen face weight-based prejudice at the workplace – even when their body mass index (BMI) is within the healthy range, the study found. “Many organisations in the service sector, such as shops, bars and hotels, seek to employ people with the right ‘look’ which will fit with their corporate image,” said one of the researchers Dennis Nickson, Professor at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland.“This study shows how women, even within a medically-healthy BMI range, still face discrimination in service sector employment,” Nickson noted. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfIn the study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, participants were asked to rate people for their suitability for jobs in the service sector, based on their appearance.The study asked 120 participants to rate eight pictures of men and women for their suitability for jobs working in a customer-facing role, such as a waiter or sales assistant in a shop, and for a non-customer facing role, such as a kitchen porter or stock assistant. Participants in the study were told that applicants were equally qualified and were shown faces that reflected a ‘normal’ weight and a subtle ‘heavier’ face.“The results found that both women and men face challenges in a highly ‘weight-conscious’ labour market, especially for customer-facing roles. However, women faced far more discrimination,” Nickson added.“We found that women, even within a normal BMI range, suffered greater weight-based bias compared to men who were overtly overweight,” Nickson noted.last_img read more

first_imgKolkata: State Finance and Industry, minister Amit Mitra on Tuesday said that both Tantuja and Manjusha have seen a remarkable turnaround in the last seven years since the Mamata Banerjee government took over in 2011.Tantuja, that had suffered a loss of Rs 12.69 crore in the year 2010-11 has registered an operational profit of Rs 10.26 crore in the 2017-18 fiscal. In reply to a poser by Trinamool Congress MLA Samir Kumar Jana at the state Assembly, Mitra, who is also in charge of the Micro Small and Medium Enterprises (MSME) and Textiles department stated that Tantuja, in the year 2010-11, has made a business of Rs 55.09 crore and incurred a loss of Rs 12.69 crore. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life”In 2011-12, the very first year we assumed office, we made a profit of Rs 69 lakh. In the 2017-18 fiscal, our turnover has gone up to Rs 204. 90 crore with a profit of Rs 10.26 crore,” the minister said. He also added that Tantuja has made a business of Rs 167.70 crore in the last seven months and the operational profit has been Rs 3.39 crore. According to Mitra, the operational profit for Manjusha has been Rs 5.87 crore in the 2017-18 fiscal and it has also registered a turnover of Rs 91.04 crore. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killed”Manjusha has made a business of Rs 167.70 crore from April to October this year and has made a profit of Rs 7.39 crore,” he said. Elaborating on the reasons behind the turnaround, the minister said Tantuja has gone for massive product diversification in terms of bringing in the latest designs in sarees and has introduced jackets, scarves etc. “The state design centre is coming up with new designs and the weavers are being encouraged to incorporate new and latest designs in sarees,” Mitra added. According to him, the state government has eliminated the role of middlemen in the entire process by introducing the sale of products through e-commerce sites and also doing away with the manual calculation of sale proceeds. “The products are now purchased directly from the Self-Help Groups and the weavers through camps in various parts of the state and payments are made directly to their bank accounts,” Mitra reiterated.last_img read more

first_img Listen Now 6 min read January 25, 2011 The secret to surviving this Great Recession may turn out to be how you manage working capital–the difference between the money you’ve been paid and the cash you owe.The good news is that clever startups are coming to market with big new ideas intended not only to change the way small businesses handle money, but in some cases to also cut out big, bad, TARP-grabbing traditional banks altogether.”The market is beginning to understand how much value there is in unlocking what is not working in the financial infrastructure,” says Aaron Patzer, vice president of the Personal Finance Group at Intuit and founder of Mint.com, the online personal finance site Intuit purchased last year.Here then, is how to get the most out of next-gen working capital.1. Put future sales to workThe old-school small-business dynamic of paying a bill by the agreed-upon due date or face usurious late fees is disappearing. BillFloat, based in San Francisco, is launching micro-credit for small business. Using investment and tech backing from online giant PayPal, BillFloat will provide as much as $1,000 of unsecured credit for 30 days to pay any bill.BillFloat charges a flat rate for each micro loan. Fees during the current beta period, for example, are $4.99 per bill for a $50 loan and as much as $14.06 to pay a $225 bill. This fee combines a 3 percent monthly interest rate and a flat service charge per bill. Lendees have 30 days to repay and can extend terms as long as they notify BillFloat. Interest continues to accrue while the balance is outstanding.Traditional banks also are morphing into financing innovators. Capital Access Network has created a product called AdvanceMe that provides working capital based on a company’s estimated future credit card transactions. The outfit also reviews other factors–including whether a company has a minimum monthly credit volume of $5,000–before agreeing to provide a lump sum. The Scarsdale, N.Y., company says the approach lets firms with lower credit scores qualify for loans.Clearly, new financing options like these will strain some small businesses. For example, as low-cost as BillFloat might be compared with charges for bounced checks, 3 percent per month works out to a near-Sopranos level of 36 percent annually. And financing tools like those offered from Capital Access Network require sophisticated accounting because, technically, the cash is not a loan, but a form of accelerated sale. Companies will need to think through options to be sure these deals make business sense.2. Get your money fasterConsidering all the innovation in digital technology and the web, small-business billing is still almost ludicrously old-fashioned snail-mail paper bills and paper checks or fast but pricey web-based billing and payment services. Now third parties are offering new ways to expedite inbound cash.Invoicera, based in New Delhi, provides services like international billing, multiple payment gateway support, fiscal team management and automatic billing. Basic tools are free, and $10 a month buys access for as many as 25 users and more features. The system requires at least a working knowledge of accounting to use properly.Bill.com in Palo Alto, Calif., offers a near-enterprise-grade billing and invoicing tool that extends to managing payroll and billing options via the web. “Small-business owners are beginning to demand the kind of controls they have in their personal banking tools from the business tools,” says Jeff Schultz, Bill.com’s vice president of marketing.Traditional financial service firms are not far behind. Charge card giant American Express is betting on a new payment service that ties web payment options, financing and other services to small-business invoices.The rub with all these is cost. American Express charges to manage receivables. Fees are complex and vary by amount and product used, but entry-level accounts cost 2.89 percent of each bill, plus 15 cents per transaction. Bill.com’s service starts at $20 per month, plus 99 cents per check and 49 cents per electronic transaction. So firms must be careful not to get buried by these costs.3. Lose the payroll, the paper and even the branchBankSimple is angling to offer all the services of a bank without the actual building. The Brooklyn, N.Y., firm is establishing a web-based financial system that will offer free ATMs, automated money management, smartphone bank deposits and free online bill payment with what the firm claims are no hidden fees and far lower costs than traditional banks.New banking hybrids are springing up fast. Austin, Texas-based MPOWER Ventures, through its prepaid debit card brand Mango Financial, recently opened its first “Mango Store” in Austin. A lower-cost alternative to high-priced check cashing, Mango’s new retail location provides prepaid MasterCards, mobile money transfers and free alternatives to many financial transactions. The service gives small businesses not only new payroll options, but also lets their employees cash checks less expensively. Mango will offer payment options for small businesses looking to pay employees in cash. It hopes to open stores across the country on a march to become the Starbucks of next-gen banking.PayNearMe is looking to do away not only with paper checks, but paper money, too. The Mountain View, Calif., company has pioneered the use of bar-coded vouchers, which any desktop imaging device can produce and which can be used to pay for anything from goods at 7-Eleven stores to rental cars from firms like Avis.There are risks for these services. Fees are higher for working through third-party ATMs, and the tax implications are significant. The IRS likes to know where your money is.4. Smarter point-of-sale For sheer innovation, it’s tough to beat the changes coming at the point-of-sale. One of the most cutting-edge is Palo Alto-based Bling Nation, which is trying to deploy a system that lets small firms create on-the-fly loyalty programs. The cash-back and points system works through BlingTag, a fob that attaches to the back of any mobile device–no cash or credit card needed. The BlingTag lets merchants track purchases, reward customers and offer discounts almost automatically.Firms like Plastic Jungle, meanwhile, are in the $30 billion market of uncashed gift cards. The San Jose, Calif., firm buys the remaining balances on unused or unwanted gift cards both from users and businesses, then resells this purchasing power to buyers using its Gift Card Exchange. Spreads range from 30 percent to 92 percent of face value, depending on the retailer and value of the gift card. “If you have gift cards on your books, this is a new way to get working capital,” says Bruce Bower, CEO of Plastic Jungle.Again, there are drawbacks. Bling Nation must work with existing credit card vendors, which can be challenging. And gift cards face steep competition from prepaid debit cards that replicate the gift card experience but can work with any retailer.”All this activity does bring excitement to the market,” says Patzer of Intuit, in Mountain View, Calif. “But getting from a good idea to a good business takes awhile.”Corrections & Amplifications: An earlier version of this article misidentified the maker of AdvanceMe in its second reference. It is Capital Access Network. Problem Solvers with Jason Feifer Hear from business owners and CEOs who went through a crippling business problem and came out the other side bigger and stronger. This story appears in the February 2011 issue of . Subscribe »last_img read more