first_imgGet 49ers news in your inbox. Sign up now for the free 49ers HQ newsletter.SANTA CLARA — Joe Staley used to be so naive.As a rookie, he witnessed a fellow 49ers offensive lineman get injured, then cut from the team. That’s when a stunned Staley launched a profane tirade against the injustice of it all.“I got really worked up,” Staley, now 34, recalled as he prepared for Sunday’s season opener against the Minnesota Vikings. “I said, ‘This is (bull)! A guy gets injured and you get rid of him …last_img read more

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download South Africa at Work contact sheet (1.5MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Ceramic artist Sharon Tlou at work in the studio of Ardmore Ceramics. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Sculptor Nomandla Phyllis Nodola at work in the studio of Ardmore Ceramics. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Master potter Lovemore Sithole at work in the studio of Ardmore Ceramics. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands:Siyabonga Mabaso, an artist at Ardmore Ceramics.Photo: Hannelie CoetzeeMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Sharon Tlou, a painter at Ardmore Ceramics.Photo: Hannelie CoetzeeMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Lovemore Sithole, a master potter at Ardmore Ceramics.Photo: Hannelie CoetzeeMediaClubSouthAfrica.com» Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Potter at work at Ardmore Ceramics.Photo: Hannelie CoetzeeMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Eunice Madlala at work in the dairy at Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Eunice Madlala at work in the dairy at Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image SOUTH AFRICA AT WORK 7: {loadposition saatwork}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at [email protected]last_img read more

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting The apps will be kept up to date by the team at Model Metrics, who are working with the group who developed the app at the Force.com Labs:We will be the ones keeping the brackets up to date 3 times per day (scores, teams, etc) so you could say we have a vested interest in the app. If you have any questions or suggestions, post them below or hit us up on Twitter @ModelMetricsInc using the #brackets hash tag. This is an app fitting for any kind of tournament, It’s fun and demonstrates the kinds of activities that people know, want to do and participate in at work. It’s good to have fun at work. It’s also good when an app is used that applies predictive game mechanics. That helps further show the value in games and the application they have in work and on a broader economic scale. Salesforce.com‘s Reid Carlberg developed a new app using Force.com to create tournament brackets for events such as the NCAA Basketball championships, that annual March event starting next week that can stir any office into a frenzy of excitement.Brackets is an app that creates brackets for a tournament that in turn becomes a point-based game based on participants predictions. Users can see how they are doing with their bets by checking the app leaderboard. It is available on AppExchange.The app has two modes of play. You can make predictions for the overall tourney or if you choose, compete on a round-by-round basis, allowing less knowledgeable participants start fresh.It includes a sample bracket for the NCAA Tournament, scheduled to start March 15. The tournament feed will be available in the app on the 14th. All teams have to be filled in to participate. Related Posts Tags:#cloud#cloud computing#news alex williams A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

first_imgBuilding Blocks (“Raring to Grow”, October 4)Kudos to your team for profiling 35 young achievers who are dreaming with imagination and excelling with innovation in their fields (“Raring to Grow”, October 4). Chosen from across the length and breadth of the country, their ambition, motivation and success stories will inspire,Building Blocks (“Raring to Grow”, October 4)Kudos to your team for profiling 35 young achievers who are dreaming with imagination and excelling with innovation in their fields (“Raring to Grow”, October 4). Chosen from across the length and breadth of the country, their ambition, motivation and success stories will inspire many others to achieve what they desire and dream.–Rohit Kumar, MumbaiThe demographic profiling of the population has brought out the promise of the present generation. These 35 young role models have excelled in spite of insurmountable odds. The number of such stories would multiply manifold if an infrastructural and academic platform is provided to them. Their talent should be nurtured with the utmost care for optimum realisation of their latent potential.–Piyush Prashant Sinha, HyderabadGames of Neglect (“Sprinting to Disaster”, October 4)Deficiencies of the system and inefficiencies of the managers are squarely responsible for the ill-preparation for the Commonwealth Games (“Sprinting to Disaster”, October 4). Our incompetencies have caused irreparable damage to India’s image. It’s a pity that the prime minister had to step in to fix loose ends and ask those responsible to focus on completing the job, instead of indulging in a blame game.–Neeharika Sinha, AllahabadWalk the Talk (“Groping in the Dark”, October 4)The all-party delegation’s visit to Srinagar was an exercise in futility, a paid vacation for the MPs who went to offer lip-service (“Groping in the Dark”, October 4). Sitaram Yechury and Gurudas Dasgupta of the Left cannot do anything to stop bloodshed. After all, their party was responsible for the carnage of innocent people in West Bengal. Parliamentarians like them don’t have any moral right to speak on humanitarian issues.–Arun Azad, JamshedpuradvertisementHeart Matters (“New Hope for the Heart”, September 27)A heart attack strikes whenever and whosoever it wants, without any forewarning (“New Hope for the Heart”, September 27). About 40 per cent of heart attack victims in India do not even reach a hospital. It not only indicates the swiftness with which it happens but also the lack of proximity to healthcare units or hospitals. People need to be more conscious and alert, and hospital charges, doctors’ fees and other medical costs need to be brought down substantially to enable patients to seek timely treatment. –Prem K. Menon, MumbaiPolitics of Peace (“The Hate India Movement, September 27)Why have India and Pakistan become favourite terror targets (“The Hate India Movement, September 27)? It is because these two nations are run by weak governments, which shy away from acting against terrorists and have become their breeding grounds due to lack of political will? Instead, they love to blame each other for the rise of terror in the sub-continent. The governments let terrorists thrive because they help them reap gain electoral dividends.–Som Sharma, GurgaonSpoiled Sport (“Cricket’s Crooks”, September 13)Cricket in Pakistan has been dogged by betting scandals for over a decade now but its cricket board has largely remained indifferent to it (“Cricket’s Crooks”, September 13). If players are found guilty, they must be banned for life. Players are accepting money from bookies, but are they doing so out of greed or is there a powerful clique within the team that threatens to end their careers if they don’t? Honest answers are needed.–J.S. Acharya, HyderabadSplit Wide Open (“Splits in Silicon Valley”, September 13)What leads to marital disputes (“Splits in Silicon Valley”, September 13)? Perhaps, the lack of work-life balance, and more often than not it is the woman who is blamed for the lack of it. Life becomes a mess, especially for working couples whose materialistic pursuits costs them marital bliss. The man, however, is seldom blamed, for he is the breadwinner and not responsible for kids and domestic chores. This work should ideally be shared by both, but a man rarely does so. If a woman can be a boardroom queen and also a domestic goddess, why can’t a man be a little more responsible, understanding and involved to make a marriage work? Happiness is not just one big thing, but it is many little things rolled into one. And these little efforts will sow the seeds for a happy marriage.–Vimal S. Thaker, Ahmedabadlast_img read more

first_imgJaipur Pink Panthers and U Mumba players in action during the final of the Pro Kabaddi league in Mumbai.As Jaipur Pink Panthers’ captain Niketan Gautam stepped into the ballroom of the after-party hosted by promoter Anand Mahindra in honour of the Pro Kabaddi League winners (PKL) at the Four Seasons’,Jaipur Pink Panthers and U Mumba players in action during the final of the Pro Kabaddi league in Mumbai.As Jaipur Pink Panthers’ captain Niketan Gautam stepped into the ballroom of the after-party hosted by promoter Anand Mahindra in honour of the Pro Kabaddi League winners (PKL) at the Four Seasons’ Hotel, Mumbai, he could not help but break into a dance with his trophy. He hugged people with it, grabbed hors d’oeuvres with it, shook hands of corporate honchos, air-kissed socialites with it, and headed to the dance floor with it.His teammates, stylishly attired in pink and blue and gathered around star player Mani, aka Maninder Singh, followed suit, awkwardly spreading out in a space they were clearly not used to. Jasvir Singh, sledger par excellence on field, grinned nervously. As the runners-up, U Mumba, shyly filed in, ushers pushed them out away from entering via the dining area and through the main hall, where they downed their drinks too quickly, and stuck to the sides of the halls. Rajesh Narwal, 24, the raider from Ridhana in Haryana, bent to touch the feet of team owner Ronnie Screwvala and his wife Zarine Mehta as they entered. By 1 a.m., a busload of Puneri Paltans joined in, and by 3 a.m., the Patna Pirates were tearing each others’ shirts off. At the first afterparty of the first PKL season, coveted by corporate well-heeled, the boys from baulk lines, its stars, were finally cool.And it’s taking some getting used to. Rahul Choudhari, star raider for the Telugu Titans, and one of the most stylish players in the league, has been overwhelmed. “I am not able to sit, in a bus, on a flight, without people coming up to me,” he says. At 26, he is watching his mother being inundated with marriage proposals. But more than anything else, where some 70 clubs played kabaddi in his hometown of Bijnor in Uttar Pradesh, he says, over 250 have mushroomed. The story repeats, from Patna Pirates captain Rakesh Kumar, who is from Nizampur in Delhi, to Anup Kumar, who is from Palra in Haryana and leads U Mumba. Where the IPL had 453 million viewers in the first 15 days, and the FIFA World Cup attracted 129 million viewers, Star Sports says the PKL hit 288 million viewers.advertisementIt’s what founder PKL promoters and brothers-in-law Charu Sharma and Mahindra call “bringing kabaddi out of the shadows and into the sunlight”. Sharma, leaning excitedly into every stand in the finals, accedes his sun is now shining brightly indeed. They’ve just announced a women’s league and a World Cup. He says as a franchise they kept expenses low and generated revenues reasonable enough to allow them to dream of breaking even. At the start of the season, Sharma kept telling team owners not to sell to people who would make them wait two days in their offices. Today, he says, they are welcomed, but no one is selling. There is faith that profitability will come.The myth that kabaddi is a rural sport is broken. The 415 professional kabaddi clubs in Greater Mumbai, the highest of any city in India, are increasingly relevant, catapulted from being leisure clubs to prime-time TRP base and potential consumer base to sell merchandise. Mahindra’s association with the sport has been to use his visibility and those of team owners such as Jaipur Pink Panthers’ Abhishek Bachchan and Aishwarya Rai Bachchan to grab the eyeballs.Non-Bollywood team owners such as Rajesh Shah of Mukund Steel, who owns Patna Pirates, have gone the whole hog. Shah has enlisted the presence of friend Vivek Oberoi, and created a theme song ‘Dhool Chata De’ written by Prasoon Joshi, composed by Aadesh Srivastava and sung by Kailash Kher to make the bang bigger. Kabaddi is a sport that has spanned urban, suburban and rural categories across income groups because it needs no equipment more than a 13x 10 sq m piece of land. In schools and towns across India, it is played on mud, derivative of the akhadas, often barefoot, and is one of the few sports that is played equally by both genders.In commercialising and hyping the sport, Sharma admits the promoters have merely tapped into an “underground” movement that has always existed. Collaterally, they have triggered a trickle-down effect that is making kabaddi popular in the gullies. Communication on the field is physical, it is in the tease of a gait, in the aggression of the slap of a thigh. This allows a vocal Indian, unhandicapped by status, dialect or gender, to win. The single largest reason for its connect is this Indianness, this negotiated tradition, says Future Group CEO Kishore Biyani. Over the past few years, top players across sports have emerged from Tier-II and Tier-III towns, and an India that once thought that to be western was cool is increasingly comfortable with the idea of being Indian. “Where we were taken by surprise is with the connect with the younger generation. We simply didn’t expect it,” says Biyani. More than just popular, the players admit, kabaddi has made being Indian, being superstitious, histrionic, emotional, physical and aggressive, incredibly cool.advertisementAlso uniting the players is the newfound pride in the humbleness of background. The burly captain of Puneri Paltans, Wazir Sing, 27, is from a farming family in Ponkheri Kheri in Haryana, works as a policeman and plays for India. He wears his antecedents of struggle and humble origins like a defining badge. All players, in fact, have government jobs. Navneet Gautam has worked with BSNL and ONGC, while Anup Kumar has worked with the CRPF, Air India and is now with Haryana Police. For many families, says Ajay Thakur, the lure of kabaddi was initially in that it was a chance to get a secure government job and pay cheque. These are not players who have had the luxury of endorsement deals. That there is now money in it, a simpler number of lakhs of rupees as opposed to an IPL player’s crores, which they receive as fee for the tournament as per the auction, is a bonus that they never saw coming. Kabaddi, the game of the soil, is making unexpected heroes of the sons of soils.Mitti ki Kasam, or the vow of the earth, is a ritual all kabaddi players follow, as they touch the earth before they enter the pitch and hold it to their eyes and heart in worship. “To us the mitti, the motherland, is everything” says Rakesh Kumar, a railway chief ticket inspector. Despite the shift from earth to synthetic rubber mats, used internationally and introduced in PKL to stylise the game, Kumar doesn’t believe players will ever lose the touch of the soil. “The mats here may be synthetic but back home, we play on mud, so we would never lose that contact. It is what gives us strength,” he says. His teammate, Tae Deok Eom, a star defender from Korea, who speaks little English and has spent his evenings after matches writing every move his rival players make, also touches the earth before entry now, though it is not a practice in Korea.Butter roti, butter naan, tandoori chicken and maa ki dal, he rattles off his newfound favourites. At first his teammates helped him avoid spice, but now he eats what they do. “Why just Mitti ki Kasam, he also shouts ‘Jai Bajrang Bali’,” his teammates tease him. In time spent training in Gujarat, Eom has acquired an Indianness about him, seemingly essential to blend in with the team. For players such as Eom, Waseem Sajjad of Pakistan and Dovlet Bashimov of Turkmenistan, kabaddi has been an introduction to all things quirkily Indian.advertisementThere is a sense of comfort among the players about being able to carry small-town India worldwide. This confidence stems from India topping the kabaddi worldwide rankings. Anup Kumar, captain of U Mumba, admits the changes-30-second raids, players wearing shoes, mats-have been difficult to adapt to. “But you know that if a change is introduced in India, it will soon be introduced worldwide. So you want to be at the forefront of change” he says in Hindi.Kumar, as also several other players, is also comfortable requesting his interviewers to speak in Hindi. The comfort of owning a game invented in India, unlike the adaptation required of those who tour with emerging football or cricketing teams, is intense. It allows Kumar to choose not to struggle with unfamiliar English. They can use a translator, he says. Foreigners on the teams also adapt, picking up Hindi. Kumar is also known for always wearing sunglasses, even off field and at night. He decides his own cool; trend-makers can take it or leave it.U Mumba team owner Screwvala warns against assuming too soon that India has become a leader in kabaddi by being the first to popularise it. “Let’s also remember that there are very few players worldwide. It isn’t great to be on top of those rankings yet. Having said that, more people play kabaddi today than they do even cricket, and cricket itself is on the wane worldwide. I would focus on the fact that we are popularising it within India, rather than internationally, and see where we can take it here,” he says.But India’s influences, as small as they may be, are unmistakably real. David Tsai, a 26-year-old raider from Taiwan, is the first ever professional Kabaddi player from his country, and is studying towards a PhD in kabaddi at the National Taiwan University. He started out by learning kabaddi from YouTube videos of Indian players at the Asian Games matches. “My aim here is to not just play, but to learn new things from India and take them back for my team at home and teach them.” On his return, he will buy regulation game shoes, and pass on techniques that he’s learnt in training.India sets the standards for what gets carried back, he says. There’s greater emphasis on muscle building and weight training in the Southeast Asian countries, he says, but it is every kabaddi player’s dream to come to India and train in technique. “Back home, they call this the Indian NBA” he says. To read more, get your copy of India Today here.last_img read more

first_imgNEW YORK (AP) — Milwaukee Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo is the cover athlete for the NBA 2K19 standard edition video game.The two-time NBA All-Star known as the “Greek Freek” is the first international player to be featured on the cover.Antetokounmpo says he has “worked hard to earn recognition in the NBA and being on the cover of NBA 2K10 is a dream come true.”NBA 2K19 will be available Sept. 11.LeBron James was previously announced as the cover star for the NBA 2K19 20th anniversary edition available on Sept. 7.FILE – In this March 29, 2018, file photo, Milwaukee Bucks’ Giannis Antetokounmpo dunks against the Golden State Warriors during the first half of an NBA basketball game, in Oakland, Calif. Antetokounmpo is the cover athlete for the NBA 2K19 standard edition video game. The two-time NBA All-Star known as the “Greek Freek” is the first international player to be featured on the cover. Antetokounmpo says he has “worked hard to earn recognition in the NBA and being on the cover of NBA 2K10 is a dream come true.”(AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)FILE – In this Sept. 25, 2017, file photo, Milwaukee Bucks’ Giannis Antetokounmpo poses for photos during the NBA basketball team’s media day in Milwaukee. Antetokounmpo is the cover athlete for the NBA 2K19 standard edition video game. The two-time NBA All-Star known as the “Greek Freek” is the first international player to be featured on the cover. Antetokounmpo says he has “worked hard to earn recognition in the NBA and being on the cover of NBA 2K10 is a dream come true.”(AP Photo/Morry Gash, File)TweetPinShare88 Shareslast_img read more