first_imgFestival season is almost over, but it’s still the hottest time of year. Beyond the obvious methods of sleep, hydration, and sunscreen, we’re here to give you a few tips to survive these next few weeks, so that you can return to work on Monday without feeling like a total sun-dried tomato.Without further ado, here are five easy ways to survive multi-day music festivals:5. Keep the bugs away by putting dryer sheets in your pocket.That’s right. If you put a Bounce dryer sheet in your pocket, it will naturally repel mosquitoes from eating you alive. It’s a simple, affordable solution to one of the most annoying problems that we almost always forget to anticipate in an outdoor setting. So as you’re packing for the weekend, you might as well pre-pack each pocket with a dryer sheet. For maximum results, wear cargo shorts.4. Drink 1 liter of coconut water every day.Coconut water is an extremely valuable source of hydration. It also facilitates digestion, reduces blood pressure, provides necessary nutrients, and is a natural hangover cure.According to lifehack.org, “The ingredients in coconut water are way more effective at hydrating the human body than those of sports and energy drinks. During rigorous exercise or extended periods of physical activity, the human body loses mineral-rich fluids. However, coconut water serves as an excellent replacement medium with 294 mg of potassium and 5 mg of natural sugar per glass, unlike your favorite sports drink that only contains half of the potassium content and five times the amount of processed sugar.”So put that sports drink away, and grab what the Earth has already provided for us. Make the liter last all day and you’ll be hydrated and ready to go all night long! Best to be consumed before bed and/or when you wake up.3. Sit down as much as possible, and close your eyes.Remember that it’s a marathon, not a sprint. If you have a foldable chair, bring it. Give those puppies a rest, they deserve it! Then close your eyes. You don’t need to fall sleep in order to get rest. If you close your eyes for just a few minutes, you will save your brain enough processing energy to last just a little bit longer later on. 2. Eat a plant-based diet. Food = Energy, so make it count. If you load yourself up with processed, fried, or saturated fats, your body won’t have enough energy to last its full potential. Instead, you should eat as many fruits and vegetables as possible to ensure that your body’s energy level will sustain through the long days and nights of walking, dancing, and everything else involved in these adventurous weekends. 1. Shower. Sleeping outside is no excuse not to shower. In fact, it’s really just another reason why you SHOULD shower! Pick a time where the lines aren’t long and get yourself in the water. Not only will it bathe you of all germs and odors, but it will revitalize your very existence with a wave of fresh energy that is otherwise unattainable. A shower will save your life (and make you more pleasant to be around). Soap recommended.Have a great weekend!last_img read more

first_imgby Anne Galloway vtdigger.org March 29, 2011 Darcie Johnston, a political campaign consultant for GOP candidates, is galvanizing support ‘ and money ‘ for a campaign to kill the universal health care bill that just passed in the House. Johnston started her organization Vermonters for Health Care Freedom, a ‘free’ market group that opposes a ‘single-payer’ style medical coverage system for the state, just a few weeks ago as a Facebook campaign.Her mini movement has ‘ thanks to money from an unnamed source ‘ migrated from the somewhat limited realm of social networking sites to a website and a burgeoning list of 200 donors, ‘friends’ and supporters. Johnston, who is the volunteer prime mover of a faction of disaffected conservatives, rallied the anti-single payer flag and got dozens of opponents of H.202, the universal health care bill, to come to the Statehouse last weekend to decry the evils of government-controlled payment systems for medical care.Johnston has formed a 501(c)(4) to collect anonymous donations for the cause, and just today launched a website featuring a V-shaped, ultra-patriotic logo wrapped in the American flag and crowned with three gold stars.DOYLE POLL SHOWS SUPPORT FOR VERMONT YANKEESen. Bill Doyle, R-Washington, a political science professor at Johnson State College, has released the results of his annual town meeting survey. Though the survey is unscientific, it’s considered to be a indicator of public opinion. This year about 15,000 Vermonters filled out the survey, representing 142 cities and towns. Doyle says it’s one of the biggest responses in the 42 years he’s conducted the survey.Forty-five percent of respondents supported renewing Entergy Corp.’s license to operate Vermont Yankee, while 41 percent said no and 14 percent were unsure.Doyle also asked Vermonters whether ‘physician-assisted suicide’ should be legalized. Fifty percent of those polled said yes; 37 percent said no; and 13 percent weren’t sure.Here is a rundown on some of the ‘yes votes.’Tougher DUI law 75 percentExpand bottle deposit 79 percentPay more for locally grown foods 63 percentRequire use of motorcycle helmets 90 percentGOLD PLATE DINNER FOR DEMSIt’s never too early to start raising money for the next campaign cycle, which is now 13 months away. Gov. Peter Shumlin began tapping donors just eight weeks into his first term as governor. The Democratic House Campaign isn’t far behind. On April 7, Democratic Party devotees will have an opportunity to break bread with House Speaker Shap Smith and three other members of his leadership team at the Chef’s Table in Montpelier for $500 a plate. Want cocktails with that? Donate $1,000 to the party and you can sip away at martinis, too.NRA TARGETS ‘RIGHT’ ANSWERLast weekend the National Rifle Association called my husband (they wouldn’t speak to me) as part of a telephone survey and wanted to know if he was concerned about the bureaucrats taking away his right to bear arms. The caller then played a recorded message from the CEO, Wayne LaPierre. The message? A secret U.S. Senate subcommittee is looking to hit the delete button on the right to bear arms. And they asked what my husband (who happened to purchase a hunting rifle for our son a few years ago) would do about it. My husband wasn’t aware that secret Senate subcommittees could change the Constitution without state ratification.When he replied that he was a proponent of gun control, the caller, a self-professed NRA member, said ‘Oh. That’s alright then. Good-bye.’ Survey completed.It wasn’t clear why the NRA would make such a concerted effort to reach out to Vermonters. Maybe it’s because as Kate Robinson reported earlier this month, Vermont has among the most liberal ‘carry’ gun laws in the nation for the carrying of concealed or visible weapons’in a car or on your person’without a permit. ‘There are no gun licensing or registration requirements, no waiting period to buy a gun, no requirement for firearms safety training before you can buy a gun, private sales do not require records and there are no state laws limiting who can buy a gun,’ Robinson wrote.The bill the NRA was worried about, H.83, which proposed stiffening penalties for gun owners whose guns have been used in teenage suicides, has gone nowhere this year.H. 244, however, a bill allowing Vermont law enforcement officials to use gun silencers was introduced in February.THE GRASS ISN’T GREENER IN VERMONTJohn Gregg reports this week in the Valley News that population growth in towns along the Connecticut River is decidedly lopsided. More people are moving to sort of tax-free New Hampshire (the Granite state does charge a 5 percent tax on unearned income) than the Green Mountain State. Gregg analyzed Census reports as the basis for his story, which appeared in theSunday edition of the Valley News.  Anne Galloway is editor of vtdigger.orglast_img read more

first_imgJun 2, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Colorado’s new system for tracking hospital admissions related to influenza is a potential model for measuring the burden of serious flu complications and the severity of flu seasons, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said today.Last September Colorado became the first state to require the reporting of hospital admissions for laboratory-confirmed flu in all age-groups, the CDC says in the Jun 3 issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Though some existing surveillance systems yield estimates of flu-related hospitalizations, no other state or national system is designed to pick up all such cases.Colorado’s first season of experience with the system indicates that “implementation of statewide, population-based surveillance for influenza-associated hospitalizations is feasible and useful for assessing the age-specific burden of serious influenza-associated morbidity and the relative severity of influenza seasons,” the CDC says.For purposes of reporting, flu-associated hospitalization was defined as a hospital admission accompanied by laboratory confirmation of flu, including confirmation by a rapid diagnostic test, according to the article. Reporting is done mainly by hospital infection-control practitioners (ICPs), who either use the state’s Web-based disease reporting system or fax reports to the state health department.By Apr 16, 2005, 50 Colorado hospitals had reported a total of 964 flu-related hospitalizations, yielding a rate of 21.0 per 100,000 people, the CDC reports. Cases peaked in the week that ended Feb 19; the same week marked the peak for the percentage of patient visits attributed to flu-like illness, as reported by sentinel healthcare providers in Colorado.By age-group, the highest rate of flu-related hospitalization was in people aged 80 and older, with 207.3 cases per 100,000. The next highest rates per 100,000 were in babies younger than 6 months, 183.0; 70- to 79-year-olds, 78.0; and children aged 6 to 23 months, 66.3. People aged 18 to 39 years had the lowest rate at 5.8 cases per 100,000.The CDC says the Colorado figures are similar to estimates based on national hospital discharge data. Those estimates include an average of 36.8 cases per 100,000 population for pneumonia and flu hospitalizations for flu seasons from 1979-80 through 2000-01.While national estimates based on hospital discharge data take at least a year to compile, the Colorado system yields “real-time, population-based” numbers. “The system provides improved ability to assess the severity of influenza seasons, track the time course of the season, determine which populations are most affected by severe influenza-related illness, and focus prevention and control efforts on those populations,” the CDC states.A national system like Colorado’s could help guide flu immunization policy and help health agencies quickly determine if a flu season is causing high rates of hospitalizations, the article says. In addition, such a system could help identify a flu pandemic and guide the public health response.Ken Gershman, MD, MPH, a Colorado epidemiologist who contributed much of the MMWR article, said Colorado had previously required healthcare providers to report all positive influenza tests. The switch to requiring only the reporting of cases involving hospitalization has lightened the workload for providers, he told CIDRAP News.”Over the past 5 or 6 years we’ve seen the number of positive tests go up quite high, because the availability of tests has become widespread,” said Gershman, who is chief of the communicable disease program in the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. “Two years ago, we had about 13,000 reports in our system, and that overwhelmed hospitals and public health.” As a result, hospitals supported changing the requirement to cover only hospital admissions, because they could see it would be less burdensome, he added.Gershman said that while Colorado is the only state that requires reporting of flu-related hospital admissions in all age-groups, a CDC colleague told him that New Jersey requires reporting of hospital cases among children.The MMWR article says the surveillance program has some limitations that are likely to result in underestimates of cases. One is that not everyone hospitalized with a respiratory illness or a flu-related exacerbation of a chronic disease is likely to be tested for flu. A second is that rapid flu tests are less sensitive than viral culture tests.The possibility of making flu-related hospitalizations reportable in more states will be discussed at next week’s annual meeting of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, CDC spokeswoman Jennifer Morcone told CIDRAP News today.CDC. Surveillance for laboratory-confirmed, influenza-associated hospitalizations—Colorado, 2004-05 influenza season. MMWR 2005 Jun 3;54(21):535-7See also:Sep 22, 2004, CIDRAP News story “Flu-related hospitalizations have risen among elderly”last_img read more