first_img Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryUndoMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailUndoPeople TodayNewborn’s Strange Behavior Troubles Mom, 40 Years Later She Finds The Reason Behind ItPeople TodayUndoTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastUndoSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesUndoBrake For ItThe Most Worthless Cars Ever MadeBrake For ItUndoBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeUndoZen HeraldNASA’s Voyager 2 Has Entered Deep Space – And It Brought Scientists To Their KneesZen HeraldUndoautooverload.comDeclassified Vietnam War Photos The Public Wasn’t Meant To Seeautooverload.comUndo KCS-content Immigration cap to spare high earners whatsapp Share Wednesday 16 February 2011 8:48 pmcenter_img whatsapp BUSINESSES have welcomed an exemption for high earners from a government immigration cap due to come into force in April.Bankers, lawyers and other highly-paid workers who earn over £150,000 per year will not be subject to the limit.Head of employment policy at the CBI, the employers’ organisation Neil Carberry said: “This announcement of new rules for the immigration cap confirms the government’s welcome decision to prioritise skilled workers.“The government is right to be putting the emphasis on the most economically beneficial part of the system.” The British Chambers of Commerce also welcomed the news.Under the new rules, employers will have to apply for a certificate of sponsorship if they wish to bring someone to the UK. An annual limit of 20,700 visas will be made available to skilled workers, whilst an extra 1,000 visas will be made available for “exceptional talent”.Firms will also be able to apply for intra-company transfers for staff paid more than £40,000 or more for a maximum of five years.Transferred employees who earn between £24,000 and £40,000 per year will be allowed to stay for one year only.Immigration minister Damian Green said: “Britain will benefit from migration provided it is controlled and directed towards improving our economy.” Show Comments ▼ More From Our Partners Man on bail for murder arrested after pet tiger escapes Houston homethegrio.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgPorsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgLA news reporter doesn’t seem to recognize actor Mark Currythegrio.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgColin Kaepernick to publish book on abolishing the policethegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.com Tags: NULLlast_img read more

first_img Lloyds pays £500m Halifax compensation Monday 21 February 2011 8:39 am alison.lock whatsapp More From Our Partners Native American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comConnecticut man dies after crashing Harley into live bearnypost.comFeds seized 18 devices from Rudy Giuliani and his employees in April raidnypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.com Share Tags: NULL whatsapp Show Comments ▼ Government-backed bank Lloyds will take a £500m charge over its handling of communications relating to some of its mortgages, after reaching a deal with the Financial Services Authority.Halifax, now part of the Lloyds group, said it has reached a voluntary agreement with the FSA to pay compensation to 300,000 mortgage customers after it admitted confusing them on the interest rate they were charged.Customers that took out a standard variable rate mortgage between 2004 and 2007 were issued with offer documents that implied they would be informed if the bank raised the interest rate cap.In fact, Lloyds only agreed to inform one specific group of customers, leaving most uninformed when it raised the cap on its standard variable rate mortgages from two to three per cent above the base rate in January 2009.Mortgage brokers queried Halifax’s right to change the rate if the documents didn’t explicitly say it would.Halifax is to write to around 600,000 customers from April onwards to clear up the confusion and would make goodwill payments to around half of them.Compensation will be based on the difference between customers’ repayments at the two and three per cent rates. Lloyds acquired the Halifax business following its purchase of rival HBOS during the height of the credit crisis in 2008.The HBOS takeover, which was brokered by the then Labour government, saddled Lloyds with billions of pounds of losses and led the government to step in and bail it out with taxpayers’ money.As a result of the bailout, the British government ended up with a stake of around 41 percent in Lloyds.Lloyds shares are down 2.18 per cent, making it one of the worst-performing stocks on the FTSE 100. last_img read more

first_imgThursday 3 March 2011 7:37 pm Tags: NULL whatsapp whatsapp Show Comments ▼ KCS-content center_img Share by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastPeople TodayNewborn’s Strange Behavior Troubles Mom, 40 Years Later She Finds The Reason Behind ItPeople TodaySenior Living | Search AdsNew Senior Apartments Coming to Scottsdale (Take A Look at The Prices)Senior Living | Search AdsSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBrake For ItThe Most Worthless Cars Ever MadeBrake For ItBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeHistorical GeniusHe Was The Smartest Man Who Ever Lived – But He Led A Miserable LifeHistorical Genius More From Our Partners Native American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFort Bragg soldier accused of killing another servicewoman over exthegrio.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPorsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFans call out hypocrisy as Tebow returns to NFL while Kaepernick is still outthegrio.com Bean unlikely to back a rate hike Inflation “may prove a little more persistent” than the Bank of England’s forecasts currently show, its deputy governor Charles Bean admitted yesterday. However, in a dovish speech, Bean gave little indication that he would vote for a rise in interest rates next week. last_img read more

first_img KCS-content Disagreements between senior Federal Reserve officials over a controversial third phase of quantitative easing (QE2) were voiced yesterday. The Fed’s Dennis Lockhart said a third phase of monetary stimulus (QE3) could not be ruled out if oil prices knock the US recovery. Yet his Fed colleague Charles Evans said “the hurdle is pretty high” for altering the asset purchasing programme. Tags: NULL whatsapp Show Comments ▼ More From Our Partners Native American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.org Monday 7 March 2011 8:30 pm whatsapp Share Fed officials clash over QE3 last_img read more

first_img KCS-content Tags: NULL Show Comments ▼ Tuesday 8 March 2011 7:25 pm whatsapp by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryBrake For ItThe Most Worthless Cars Ever MadeBrake For ItDefinitionDesi Arnaz Kept This Hidden Throughout The Filming of ‘I Love Lucy’DefinitionTaonga: The Island FarmThe Most Relaxing Farm Game of 2021. No InstallTaonga: The Island FarmMartha Stewart CBDShop Martha Stewart’s CBD Products NowMartha Stewart CBDLuxury SUVs | Search AdsThese Cars Are So Loaded It’s Hard to Believe They’re So CheapLuxury SUVs | Search AdsElvenarIf You Need to Kill Time on Your Computer, this Fantasy Game is a Must-Have. No Install.ElvenarSwift VerdictChrissy Metz, 39, Shows Off Massive Weight Loss In Fierce New PhotoSwift VerdictStyleVamp11 Celebs And Their Historical DoubleStyleVamp whatsappcenter_img NEWS Corp chief operating officer Chase Carey upped the ante yesterday in negotiations to buy BSkyB, claiming his company has already offered a “fair price” of 700p.The BSkyB board has previously hinted it will recommend a bid of over 800p a share but the broadcaster has continued to strengthen its position since then, hitting its target of 10m subscribers and increasing its first-half profits by 40 per cent year-on-year.Carey said News Corp is still focused on getting the proposed transaction through regulatory clearance and said his company had already valued BSkyB fairly.But BSkyB investors including Fidelity, which owns three per cent, and hedge fund boss Frank Brosens, who owns 1.18 per cent, are hoping to push the price as high as 950p a share. BSkyB shares closed yesterday at 828.50p, up from 763p just a month earlier.Talks between the two sides were broken off while regulatory clearance was sought, with culture secretary Jeremy Hunt finally giving the green light earlier this month. Share More From Our Partners A ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPuffer fish snaps a selfie with lucky divernypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.org News Corp ups ante on BSkyB last_img read more

first_imgSunday 20 March 2011 11:26 pm More From Our Partners Killer drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.com Show Comments ▼ whatsapp KCS-content Tags: NULLcenter_img The ongoing sequence of tragedies in Japan has understandably shaken investor sentiment heavily. In two days last week the Nikkei lost 17 per cent and markets around the world fell accordingly, with the FTSE 100 dropping over six per cent in six sessions before showing some composure at the tail end of the week.The question though as to whether such a rapid fall as this was rational is not so easily answered.Looking at the pure economic ties between Japan and the UK for instance, it’s hard to justify why UK stocks should fall so heavily. According to Jefferies Fixed Income, the UK has an exposure to Japan equivalent to one per cent of GDP, made up of exporting goods and services, in addition to income derived from investments.On another level the UK, as of the end of 2008, had £398bn of outstanding assets in Japan. How much of that has been endangered by events that have affected at most eight per cent of Japan’s economic output?You might ask if the UK will be hit by the breakdown of the Japanese export leviathan that has been interrupted more by ensuing power cuts than the earthquake, tsunami and ongoing nuclear crisis? Maybe – but you have to remember times have changed. In 1990 the UK was the number five global destination for Japanese goods. By 2009 it wasn’t in the top ten, according to an HSBC report looking at IMF trade statistics.Some economists have argued that in the medium to longer term the rebuilding of Japan’s north east will be a source of GDP positivity and could help draw the country out of its long term deflationary malaise. Won’t British companies figure in the reconstruction in some ways?So why did global markets fall so aggressively? The pragmatic answer is that nerves were already frayed by events in the Middle East and North Africa, ongoing unanswered questions over the sustainability of European and US debt levels and perhaps by the fact that the equity markets had in some cases doubled off their March 2009 lows. Japan may just have been the last straw.In fact, I’ve been surprised by the number of commentators who, while acknowledging the enormity of the human tragedy and devastating destruction of economic capacity in Japan, have welcomed the opportunity to take a look at the valuation of equities following the rout in share prices. Some of the most cautious investors have been waiting for an entry point for months now and are picking up stocks across the board.As HSBC’s Stephen King puts it: “Knee-jerk economic and financial reactions to shocks and disaster often fall wide of the mark.”Steve Sedgwick co-anchors Squawk Box Europe weekday mornings on CNBC Japanese disasters shook markets too much Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryUndoMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailUndoTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastUndoSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesUndoBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeUndoPeople TodayNewborn’s Strange Behavior Troubles Mom, 40 Years Later She Finds The Reason Behind ItPeople TodayUndoautooverload.comDeclassified Vietnam War Photos The Public Wasn’t Meant To Seeautooverload.comUndoElite HeraldExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesElite HeraldUndoDrivepedia20 Of The Most Underrated Vintage CarsDrivepediaUndo whatsapp Sharelast_img read more

first_imgThursday 31 March 2011 8:43 pm Denmark could teach Ireland a lesson whatsapp SO Ireland’s banks need another €24bn if they are to become strong enough to withstand another shock. It is a fiscal catastrophe of immense proportions to which the European establishment doesn’t seem to have much of an answer, at least not right now. But if you want to see how to really deal with troubled banks, don’t waste your time getting to grips with the Irish fiasco – go to Denmark, which has emerged as a (relative) oasis of common sense in a world that has largely taken leave of its senses. The authorities there have done the sensible thing: rather than assuming that a bank’s bondholders are sacred and should always be bailed out, for fear of frightening the horses, they imposed a 41 per cent haircut on the unsecured senior bonds of Amagerbanken, a regional lender. That bank had made stupid investments and failed in February. Rightly, it wasn’t just the shareholders who paid the price – it was also the bondholders, who lost a large chunk of their investments. As a result, Moody’s cut its credit ratings on a range of Denmark-based lenders, which means much of the sector will have to pay higher interest rates to borrow – but such is life. It is right that an increased rate of default be priced in: it is not the state’s role to endlessly bail out the financial system. The Danish authorities have emerged as key proponents of this more rational approach and have even written to the European authorities, urging them to be harsher on senior bondholders. Debt write-offs must be conducted in a calm and controlled manner. We can’t go overnight from a position where all financial debt is guaranteed by the state to one where none is. But as a first step smaller, non-systemic countries such as Portugal, as well as smaller financial institutions everywhere, shouldn’t be bailed out at all. As a second step, special bankruptcy and resolution schemes must be introduced for the largest institutions. These would allow a controlled wind-down of bust banks: they could be dismantled without endangering the economy. Traditional bankruptcy regimes are fine for most firms but not for systemically important ones such as giant universal banks; utilities (including nuclear power plants) and large airports which are already governed by special rules. Speaking earlier this week, Bob Diamond, Barclays’ boss, said that his own firm’s living will –?and hence ability to be wound down in an orderly fashion in the event of failure –?is nearing completion. This is excellent news: most commentators don’t realise just how far down that road many big banks have already moved, in Europe as well as the US. But there is one big danger facing the financial system, and that is the regulatory requirement for banks and insurance firms to own sovereign debt. Fortunately, the UK government remains solvent, unlike Portugal. But the fact that UK banks and building societies bought £29.6bn worth of gilts between November and February, equivalent to 84 per cent of net gilt issuance, is unhealthy. Banks are quietly delivering the QE2 stimulus sought by some. That may be fine in the case of the UK, where the risk of default is low – but the fact that European financial companies have been encouraged or forced to hold vast amounts of dodgy local sovereign debt could destroy other European economies. Bail-outs must end – but so should stupid regulations that pretend that nations can never go bust. [email protected] me on Twitter: @allisterheath Tags: NULLcenter_img Share KCS-content Show Comments ▼ whatsapplast_img read more

first_img Share Show Comments ▼ whatsapp Sunday 3 April 2011 11:56 pm Read This NextWATCH: Shohei Ohtani continues home run tear, Los Angeles Angels winSportsnautYoga for Beginners: 3 Different Types of Yoga You Should TryFamily ProofHiking Gadgets: Amazon Deals Perfect For Your Next AdventureFamily ProofChicken Bao: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofWhat to Know About ‘Loki’ Ahead of Disney+ Premier on June 9Family ProofBack on the Rails for Summer New York to New Orleans, Savannah and MiamiFamily ProofBaked Sesame Salmon: Recipes Worth CookingFamily Proof’A Quiet Place Part II’ Sets Pandemic Record in Debut WeekendFamily ProofCheese Crostini: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily Proof Oil firms may move rigs out of UK waters whatsapp Tags: NULL MAJOR UK oil and gas firms are drawing up plans to move their drilling rigs out of the North Sea’s British waters to avoid punitive changes to the tax regime, City A.M. has learned. British gas owner Centrica and others are considering plans to move rigs out of UK waters to Norwegian and Dutch areas of the sea to avoid a 12 per cent hike in oil production taxes.Centrica told Treasury officials and government ministers at meetings last week that it is also reconsidering £700m of new North Sea investment it announced only in February.Sources close to Centrica told City A.M. that “a number of companies are looking at their options” and that they could “refocus their production” in the region if the tax was imposed. A Centrica spokesman said no decision had been made on moving rigs out of UK waters but said the firm was “assessing the impact” of the tax raid.“We are assessing the impact of the proposed tax increase on all of our operations and projects that we have in our plan and that includes the £700m investment,” he said.Michael Tholen, economics and commercial director at UK Oil and Gas, said rigs could be easily moved across borders by tug boat or internal engines and linked to new pipelines. “It is wholly understandable that companies which have operations in both the UK and the Netherlands may now switch investment abroad,” he said. KCS-content last_img read more

first_img whatsapp John Dunne Tags: NULL Lloyds eyes deal with Grainger whatsapp Sharecenter_img More From Our Partners Man on bail for murder arrested after pet tiger escapes Houston homethegrio.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgColin Kaepernick to publish book on abolishing the policethegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgKansas coach fired for using N-word toward Black playerthegrio.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgLA news reporter doesn’t seem to recognize actor Mark Currythegrio.com Tuesday 26 April 2011 3:56 am Show Comments ▼ by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesMoneyPailShe Was An Actress, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailLuxury SUVs | Search AdsThese Cars Are So Loaded It’s Hard to Believe They’re So CheapLuxury SUVs | Search Adsmoneycougar.comThis Proves The Osmonds Weren’t So Innocentmoneycougar.comDrivepedia20 Of The Most Underrated Vintage CarsDrivepediaBetterBeDrones Capture Images No One Was Suppose to SeeBetterBeZen HeraldThe Truth About Why ’40s Actor John Wayne Didn’t Serve In WWII Has Come To LightZen HeraldSenior Living | Search AdsNew Senior Apartments Coming Nearby Scottsdale (Take a Look at The Prices)Senior Living | Search Ads Part-nationalised bank Lloyds is eying a deal with the UK’s largest listed housing landlord Grainger aimed at restoring the value of Lloyds’ housing portfolio which got hit by the credit crisis.A Lloyds spokesman said that Grainger had been picked as Lloyds’ preferred supplier for its “residential property asset management platform.”The likely deal between the two companies will see Grainger manage a portfolio of homes on behalf of administrators for housing groups that had been backed by Lloyds.The government has stakes of around 41 per cent in Lloyds and 83 per cent in rival Royal Bank of Scotland after it had to bail out both banks with taxpayers’ money during the credit crisis.As a result of the state bailout, European regulators ordered Lloyds and RBS to sell off a host of assets. last_img read more

first_img Topics: Casino & games Finance Sports betting Poker Table games Casino & games 30th May 2019 | By contenteditor Nevada’s gaming revenue for April came in at $936.5m, the first month that the state’s total has failed to hit the $1bn mark in 2019. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Nevada’s gaming revenue for April came in at $936.5m, the first month that the state’s total has failed to hit the $1bn mark in 2019. Total revenue was down 1.8% year-on-year, and 8.5% sequentially. The majority of state revenue was derived from slots, which accounted for $658.8m (70.3%) of the total, up marginally year-on-year.This was offset by a 5.8% drop in table, counter and card games (including sports and race betting) to $277.7m.Read the full story on iGB North America. Email Address Tags: Card Rooms and Poker Mobile Online Gambling Regions: US Nevada Nevada revenue falls below $1bn for first time in 2019 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterlast_img read more