first_imgTotal Petroleum Ghana Limited (TOTAL.gh) listed on the Ghana Stock Exchange under the Energy sector has released it’s 2020 annual report.For more information about Total Petroleum Ghana Limited reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations visit the Total Petroleum Ghana Limited company page on AfricanFinancials.Indicative Share Trading Liquidity The total indicative share trading liquidity for Total Petroleum Ghana Limited (TOTAL.gh) in the past 12 months, as of 5th May 2021, is US$279.81K (GHS1.62M). An average of US$23.32K (GHS135.15K) per month.Total Petroleum Ghana Limited Annual Report DocumentCompany ProfileTotal Petroleum Ghana Limited supplies petroleum and allied products for vehicles with petrol and diesel engines as well as fuel and fuel oil for the aviation, marine and mining sectors in Ghana. The company also supplies a range of automotive lubricants and special fuels including racing fuels and lubricants, biocides, industry fuels, refining additives and performance additives. Total Petroleum Ghana Limited offers expertise and services to support the mining supply chain which include a fluid analysis laboratory, fuel management system, filtration and contamination management, mobile tank solutions, on-site refueling, road transport safety and solar energy solutions. Total Petroleum Ghana Limited is a subsidiary of Ghanstock Limited. Total Petroleum Ghana Limited is listed on the Ghana Stock Exchangelast_img read more

first_img Danny Cipriani came on as a replacement on the ninth minute The HSBC Waratahs have started the 2011 Super Rugby season in emphatic fashion, ruining the Melbourne Rebels’ inaugural match with a 43-0 whitewash at AAMI Park to be the first side to raise the Edward ‘Weary’ Dunlop Shield. It represented an awful start for the new side.Cipriani wasn’t picked to start, but came of the bench to replace James Hilgendorf, after just nine minutes. Behind a beaten pack he endured a painful debut.The Tahs were forced to withstand an initial onslaught from the home side which saw them camped in the NSW half for much of the opening quarter. However two tries before half-time and 33 unanswered points in the second 40 minutes finished a strong team performance for the visitors. It is the first time a NSW team has held the opposition scoreless since the Super 12 commenced in 1996.A marching band followed by a stirring rendition of the national anthem set the tone for a passionate start to the game which saw Dean Mumm and Kevin O’Neill both shown a yellow card in just the sixth minute of play.The Rebels continued to push the advantage early on however the Tahs’ defence proved airtight and the first real opportunity fell the visitors’ way before play broke down following a Kurtley Beale break.Though it took 25 minutes, it was Beale who finally scored the opening try of the season following a turnover and a break through the centre by tireless captain Phil Waugh.Momentum had quickly shifted the Tahs way and seven minutes later Drew Mitchell, who topped the competition’s tryscoring list in 2010, kicked off his 2011 tally. Berrick Barnes missed his second tough conversion attempt and despite NSW going close in the shadows of half-time, they went to the break holding a 10-0 lead.NSW started the second half the way they finished the first, and a driving maul from a lineout saw Tatafu Polota-Nau notch one for the forwards.Three minutes later a snipe from a centre-field scrum saw Luke Burgess create enough space to send Mitchell under the posts for his second try. Barnes converted for a 22-0 lead.In the 53rd minute Beale collected a double of his own when the ball was shifted from wing to wing and the fullback held momentum through the tackle of Luke Rooney to cross in the right corner.Ten minutes later, and after a period of dominating scrum play from the Tahs’ forwards, Rob Horne celebrated his return from an elbow injury by crossing inside the left touchline. Barnes nailed his third conversion on the trot to open up a 34-0 break.Chris Hickey started to wheel the changes in the last 20 minutes, but before he gave his captain a rest, Waugh ploughed over from the back of a driving maul for his 13th Super Rugby try which takes him into the Tahs’ top ten since the competition’s inception.Beale converted for a 43-0 lead, and while the Rebels continued to throw punches in the dying stages, the Tahs kept their defensive record perfect for the first time ever in Super Rugby. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The historic match was also a memorable one for a number of players who achieved individual milestones: Tom Carter was awarded his 50th State Cap; Daniel Halangahu brought up his 50th Super Rugby appearance for NSW; Phil Waugh played his 50th match as NSW captain; Al Baxter played his 116th match for NSW taking him ahead of Matt Burke and into third on the all-time list; Ryan Cross played his 50th Super Rugby match, although along with Sitaleki Timani and Brendan McKibbin it was his NSW debut.The HSBC Waratahs return to Sydney tomorrow and are back in training on Monday ahead of their Templeton Cup clash with the Queensland Reds at ANZ Stadium on Saturday 26 February.HSBC Waratahs 43 (Drew Mitchell 2, Kurtley Beale 2, Tatafu Polota-Nau, Rob Horne, Phil Waugh tries; Berrick Barnes 3 cons, Kurtley Beale con) d Melbourne Rebels 0 at AAM Park, Melbourne VIC. Half-time: HSBC Waratahs 10-0. Yellow Cards: Kevin O’Neill (Rebels) and Dean Mumm (HSBC Waratahs), fighting, 6th minute. Referee: Mark Lawrence (RSA). Crowd: 25,524.By the clock6th – Yellow Card: Kevin O’Neill (Melbourne Rebels) & Dean Mumm (HSBC Waratahs), fighting25th – Kurtley Beale try; Berrick Barnes missed conversion. HSBC Waratahs 5-030th – Berrick Barnes missed drop goal32nd – Drew Mitchell try; Berrick Barnes missed conversion. HSBC Waratahs 10-043rd – Tatafu Polota-Nau try; Berrick Barnes missed conversion. HSBC Waratahs 15-046th – Drew Mitchell try; Berrick Barnes conversion. HSBC Waratahs 22-053rd – Kurtley Beale try; Berrick Barnes conversion. HSBC Waratahs 29-0 BALLARAT, AUSTRALIA – JANUARY 29: Danny Cipriani of the Rebels runs with the ball during the Super Rugby Trial Match between the Melbourne Rebels and Fiji at St Patrick’s College on January 29, 2011 in Ballarat, Australia. (Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images) 63rd – Rob Horne try; Berrick Barnes conversion. HSBC Waratahs 36-067th – Phil Waugh try; Kurtley Beale conversion. HSBC Waratahs 43-0last_img read more

first_img Tagged with: Consulting & Agencies Funding legacies AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  24 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Howard Lake | 14 March 2011 | News Wootton George Consulting Wootton George Consulting is the UK’s premier hands-on fundraising agency, providing expert advice and practical support to help our clients grow. Established in 1998, our team of 20 experienced professionals covers most fundraising disciplines.We offer a wide range of advice and support, from fundraising reviews, feasibility studies and strategy development to hands-on support with funder research, bid writing and campaign development. See www.wgconsulting.co.uk/services.html for details.Many clients make use of our Fundraising Placements service, which provides interim support during staff shortages. For details, see www.wgconsulting.co.uk/placements.htmlTwo-thirds of our work comes by recommendation or as repeat assignments. See our website for case studies and testimonials.We are Members of the Association of Fundraising Consultants, as well as NCVO Approved Consultants and individual Members of the Institute of Fundraising.For a free discussion of your needs, please ring Simon George on 01785 663600last_img read more

first_img Business News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Business News Local Business Owners Brace for Financial Fallout of New ‘Limited’ Stay-at-Home Order By DAVID CROSS and BRIAN DAY Published on Friday, November 20, 2020 | 1:49 pm Top of the News More Cool Stuff Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. 41 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News Herbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Most Influential Women In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyRemove Belly Fat Without Going Under The KnifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Brutally Honest Reasons Why You’re Still SingleHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Special Massage Techniques That Will Make You Return For MoreHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeauty STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week center_img Make a comment Business owners across Pasadena are preparing for a second round of stay-at-home orders issued by state health officials — this time limited to nighttime hours — that take effect Saturday night.Locally the Pasadena Department of Public Health revised its health order Wednesday to require restaurants, breweries and bars to shut down outdoor service and dining areas between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m., effective Friday. Personal care services that require customers or staff to remove their masks, such as shaves and facials, were disallowed, and personal care businesses were limited to 25% capacity.New restrictions from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health went a bit further, extending the business curfew through 6 a.m., mandating that outdoor restaurants, breweries and wineries be limited to 50% capacity and requiring businesses allowed to operate indoors to operate at no more than 25% capacity. But the county order did not affect Pasadena, which is governed by its own public health agency.Then new statewide restrictions announced Thursday by the California Department of Public Health, “requiring generally that non-essential work, movement and gatherings stop between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m.in counties in the purple tier,” according to a statement issued by Gov. Gavin Newsom’s office. The new rules go into effect Saturday and were scheduled to remain in effect through Dec. 21.“The order did not apply to those experiencing homelessness,” according to a letter from Acting State Public Health Officer Dr. Erica Pan.“Nothing in this order prevents any number of persons from the same household from leaving their residence, lodging, or temporary accommodation, as long as they do not engage in any interaction with — or otherwise gather with — any number of persons from any other household, except as specifically permitted herein,” she wrote.Pasadena Chamber of Commerce President Paul Little said it didn’t seem to make sense for health officials to keep targeting restaurants and other businesses in response to the pandemic.“What all of the health people are saying is that they can’t track this latest spike to anything other than Halloween, Biden winning the elections, the Dodgers, that kind of stuff,” he said. “They say specifically that it’s not restaurants, it’s not hair salons, it’s not gyms, it’s not any of those things.”“To Pasadena’s credit, they’re being less restrictive than the county in what they’re doing, but they have to follow the state guidelines,” Little said. “But my understanding is they’re not imposing any kind of capacity restrictions on outdoor dining, for example.”Some businesses are quickly reaching their breaking points, he said. “For certain businesses, we’re past it.”“We’re seeing not just places that opened up a year ago closing, we’re seeing a lot of places close that have been around for a while,” according to Little. “There are just more empty storefronts here, there and everywhere.”“Another round of PPP is needed by so many businesses because they’re going to hit a point where they can’t make payroll and can’t stay open without some form of help and assistance,” he said.Gregg Smith, co-owner of the Smith Brothers Restaurant Corporation, which operates three eateries in Pasadena, said the new restrictions will pose a challenge, but he also takes the threat of COVID-19 very seriously.“We certainly sympathize and agree with the concerns over the COVID surge and we agree with the severity and the urgency to get this under control. We are making arrangements to stop taking orders after 10 o’clock at night,” he said.Although Smith, too, said he didn’t believe the surge was driven by restaurants or other businesses.And the timing of the surge and associated restrictions is especially unfortunate, he added. With so many businesses dependent on holiday shopping to get through the year, “If this goes into December, this is going to majorly impact every restaurant and every retailer you see. But we know we are going to certainly do our part in the best interest of everyone.”Another full shutdown of businesses, as was seen in the early days of the pandemic, however, “would be a totally absurd disaster after what they’ve already done to businesses in general. Businesses are going to start closing left and right.”For now, “We will hang in there,” Smith said. “We recognize that everyone has to be pulling on the same rope and we will certainly do our part to help curb this virus quickly as we possibly can. And, the 10 o’clock [restriction], we can make that work.”Rocco’s Tavern owner Leo Armari said he is optimistic his businesses will survive, thanks to strong community support. But the restrictions “have made it much more difficult though.”He said that his nighttime business on the heated restaurant patios has recently been strong, and the new 10 p.m. business curfew will definitely make an impact.“In actuality, because there are so many other businesses shuttered, I’m sad to say, especially ones that would stay open late…we did a decent amount of business — maybe 20% of our business — was from 10 to 2. We’ll lose quite a bit of business,” Amari said. “We had steady business, especially when you look towards the end of the week, Thursday through Sunday, where people would eat out later.”Amari said he understood the need to combat the spread of COVID-19, but didn’t believe business owners should be left in the cold.“I agree with anything that’ll slow down the virus, but I feel like there should be some compensation given from the governments that just target restaurants — especially restaurants — for these closures,” he said. That’s my argument all along: This isn’t right to do to people who worked their whole lives for something.”With respect to small businesses spreading the virus, “I don’t see it, personally,” Amari said. ”But I have a very small sampling compared to what [health officials] have.”Amari estimated that without assistance, his businesses likely wouldn’t make into the second half of 2021.“Every business that closes, every restaurant that closes is heartbreaking to me, because I know what they’re going through,” he said.Whether from the federal or state government, relief for businesses is needed, and soon, Amari said. “If it comes later, it’s going to be too late.”See also:Pasadena Implements New Safeguards, Restrictions to Curb COVID-19 Spread, Starting FridayPasadena’s Viral Surge Continues: 55 New COVID-19 Cases, 1 Death Reported ThursdaySafer-At-Home Order Could Be Reinstated Subscribe Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Darrel Done BusinessVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

first_img Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Sponsored Content You Might Like Extended ‘last chance’ to view arts exhibit at Johnson Center In order to offer the community an extended time to view the “Celebrating Contemporary Art in Alabama: The Nature of… read more Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Published 6:05 pm Wednesday, November 4, 2009 By The Penny Hoarder Pleasant Hill Missionary Baptist Church currently has 150 members under the leadership of the Rev. C.L. Foster.Sunday morning services are held weekly with special events on the fifth Sunday of the month.The Wednesday night Bible studies are weekly events for the members of Pleasant Hill.“We are a growing church and have great confidence that God will continue to let us grow bodily as well as spiritually.” The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Print Article Pleasant Hill makes state registry Troy falls to No. 13 Clemsoncenter_img By Jaine Treadwell “A church was later built and, if you take the bricks away, you could see the old wood walls of the early church,” Lampley said.Over the many years, Pleasant Hill has been a part of Tennille and Brundidge, many pastors have served the communities.“At times, the church was left without a pastor but was never without Divine guidance,” Lampley said.“We thank the Lord for each of the ministers and what they meant to us. And, we cannot forget those old soldiers that have gone on that worked so faithfully, with God’s help, to give us the foundation for a serving church.” Pleasant Hill Missionary Baptist Church will celebrate Heritage Sunday on the fifth Sunday in November with dedication ceremonies for both its church building and cemetery.“Pleasant Hill was organized in 1860 so we will be celebrating our 149th year,” said Deacon David Lampley. “This celebration will be very special, too, in that both our church and our cemetery have been accepted for listing on the Alabama Register of Landmarks and Historic Places. The historic markers will be in place on Heritage Sunday and we’ll have dedication services for both of these historic sites.”Lampley’s great grandfather, Green Stephens, was one of three original church deacons and Lampley said he is very honored to have such a storied legacy in the church. Latest Stories Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Acid Reflux (Watch Now)Healthy LifestyleIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Book Nook to reopen Email the author Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Next Up“Pleasant Hill originated from Springfield Baptist Church, which was the white Baptist church in Tennille at the time,” he said.“We were told that some of the old blacks attended church there for a while and then some of the older ones asked for permission to start a church for the blacks. The land was purchased by a gentleman called Mr. Faulk.”The Rev. Ethan Smith was the first pastor to conduct services under a brush arbor on or near the site of the present church.last_img read more

first_imgStudents have been warned that a failure to follow official sub fusc regulation could lead to “serious inconveniences” and delays.The reminder comes after some attempted to graduate with what University Proctors considered excessive “flesh” on show, among other infringements on the University’s graduation dress-code.The email sent to students cited a number of infractions including bare legs or no socks or tights, non-dark footwear, and coloured clothing. At this year’s ceremony, some women wearing high-heeled shoes without socks were barred entry to the ceremony until they covered up.French graduate Eleanor Broome’s ceremony was delayed by fifteen minutes as she “had to run, in full sub fusc and gown, through the crowded streets round the Sheldonian in a desperate search for black socks.”After eventually finding a pair of tights to wear under her trousers, she was allowed entry to her graduation. She told the Telegraph that she thought the regulations to be “so outdated” for not considering women wearing trousers and heels.She said: “It was a boiling hot July, I didn’t want to wear covered lace up shoes and black socks.“I did really love my degree and I loved my time at Oxford, but what should have been the happiest day of my life turned into the angriest day of my life.”On her Facebook page she shared what she called a “provocative photo of my exposed ankles.”She told Cherwell: “It’s mad [the university] takes it so seriously and won’t allow people to do exams or graduate.”She added that she has never seen a male student be “told off”.She also referred to an incident in her Finals during which a female student was threatened with being barred from re-entering the exam room after leaving to go to the toilets without her gown.Broome told Cherwell: “When we were doing finals, one girl came in, sat down, took off her gown, got up to go to the loo and then when she came back, the exam invigilator said, ‘By rights I don’t have to allow you back in because you are not wearing your gown.’”In response to her own situation, Broome thanked her friend for who “literally risked not graduating because she wanted to make sure I found some socks” and her mother for “putting up with me in spite of my ankle exposing tendencies.”Rebecca Morton also had difficulty attending her graduation ceremony as she too was “showing flesh”, according to University officials.She told the Telegraph that she also saw sexism in the University’s dress code regulations saying they are “designed for a default male student.”“It is one of the many ways in which the University continues to adhere to a set of archaic regulations that are coded for men.”In response to these complaints, a spokesperson for the University said: “The note went out to College Deans of Degrees at the start of summer as a reminder of the dress code for degree ceremonies.“The note was intended to avoid delays to ceremonies, as a courtesy to everyone attending. “We are not aware of any significant delays as a result this year.”last_img read more

first_imgBack in November, Dave Matthews got together with Cuban singer-songwriter Carlos Varela, a key player in Cuba’s Nueva Trova movement, for a private event in Washington, DC to benefit The Center for Democracy in the Americas. Today, a full taping of the intimate performance has emerged. The first third of the video captures a Dave Matthews solo set of three songs before welcoming Varela and his band (Aldo Lopez Gavilán, piano; Yissy García, drums; Julio Cesar González, bass) to join him for the rest of the set. The hour-long performance ran through favorites from Dave Matthew’s catalog including “Save Me,” “#41,” and an encore of “Ants Marching.” The group also performed a song of Varela’s “Muros y Puertas.”The proceeds from the event, which celebrated the 10th anniversary of the Center, went toward normalizing relations between the U.S. and Cuba, two countries with a tenuous history at best. Matthews and Varela have played together a handful of times during 2016, both on American and Cuban soil, as part of the cultural exchange program established with the lifting of the Cuban embargo. Matthews serves on the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities and Varela has served as a cultural delegate to Cuba.Watch the performance and check out the setlist below, courtesy of Jason E. Stessel.Dave Matthews Solo Set03:30 Little Red Bird08:05 Don’t Drink the Water14:16 OhDave Matthews With Carlos Varela and Band19:00 Save Me24:14 #4131:01 Samurai Cop38:09 Muros y Puertas*Encore46:33 Ants Marching[H/T JamBase]last_img read more

first_imgIf you have it, you probably don’t know it. Cytomegalovirus, or CMV, is perhaps one of the biggest pathogens you’ve never heard of — big both proportionately and epidemiologically. It contains approximately 200 genes, compared to HIV’s paltry 18, and it’s everywhere. You can catch it as a preschooler salivating over blocks, or as a teenager experiencing your first kiss. Once you have it, you have it for life.The good news: If you’re healthy, it’s harmless. Your T cells keep it in check, and you’ll be none the wiser.The bad news: If you have any medical condition that dampens your immune system, such as HIV infection or a recent organ transplant, the virus can assert itself with a vengeance. The results, sometimes, are life-threatening.Researchers in the lab of Steven Gygi, professor of cell biology at Harvard Medical School, report that they have discovered a menu of tactical secrets CMV employs. Using mass spectrometry, a technological platform commonly employed in physics and chemistry, the researchers were able to describe the dynamics of a CMV infection in a fibroblast, or connective tissue cell, over a three-day course of infection. As a result, the researchers discovered ways CMV evades the immune system, and also showed how certain viral proteins target and destroy human proteins that defend against infection.“This is an entirely new way of studying the behavior and tactics of viruses,” said Gygi.These results are published in the June 5 Cell.Mass spectrometry has existed for more than a century, used primarily by physicists and chemists to describe and measure small molecules. Inside the mass spectrometer tool (or mass spec), molecules are shattered by an electric charge and then brought through a magnetic field where they are characterized one by one.Traditionally, this approach has not been relevant for the life sciences because biomolecules such as proteins are too large for the process. But over the last 15 years, Gygi has been innovating ways to incorporate mass spec into biology. In one approach, “electrospray,” subunits of proteins called peptides are vaporized and then sprayed into a chamber where they are broken apart by helium. The mass spec then sequences the amino acids of each peptide. The molecules are “reassembled” through an algorithm that matches them to a protein database.Michael Weekes, a postdoctoral researcher in the Gygi lab and an expert in infectious disease, decided to use mass spec for virology. He chose CMV because, for a virus that is so widespread, very little is known about it. “Many scientists are interested in CMV, but few if any have tried to tackle it in a comprehensive way before,” he said.Weekes took a sample of fibroblasts newly infected with CMV, harvested the proteins from both the virus and the cell, and sprayed them into the mass spec at different times over three days in order to construct a thorough trajectory of infection. The first three days of infection are particularly important since they mark a covert stage in which the virus hijacks, but hasn’t yet destroyed, the cell.The researchers were able to study approximately 8,000 total proteins, identifying not only ways that CMV evades the immune system, but also discovering a number of new therapeutic targets. Most notably, they were able to look closely at proteins that live on the cell surface. This is especially crucial since most drugs target cell surface proteins, yet these proteins are harder to study than proteins inside the cell due to their low numbers.Weekes and his colleagues found 29 viral proteins living on the cell surface, 23 of which had not been discovered previously. Many of these CMV surface proteins deter immune cells. Others block cellular proteins that activate immunity. In other words, CMV wards off rescuers while disabling a cell’s ability to defend itself.“So much of this viral genome is dedicated to simply evading the immune system,” said Weekes.The next step, according to the researchers, would be to identify antibodies against many of these viral proteins, ideally destroying infected cells before they replicate and spread the pathogen.“This would be an entirely new way to combat CMV,” said Weekes.This study was funded by the Wellcome Trust Fellowship and a National Institutes of Health grant.last_img read more

first_imgWhile Massachusetts K-12 students as a group consistently rank at or near the top in the nation for their academic performance, not every local school district has found the secret to success.Take Lawrence, an industrial, Latino-majority city 25 miles north of Boston with a school system that has about 13,000 students, 90 percent of whom are from low-income homes and 70 percent of whom speak English as a second language. The district had a long history of leadership instability and student underperformance. Only half of its students typically graduated from high school in four years, and its test scores ranked in the bottom five for the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) state-run exams for both math and English language arts during the 2010-2011 school year.That spotty track record prompted state officials, for the first time, to take control of the school system in late 2011, paving the way for a top-to-bottom reorganization, new leadership, and sweeping reforms that began in early 2012 and are still continuing.Among the changes:Higher performance expectations were established for the district;More flexibility was added for each school to determine what strategies worked best and what support was needed;The management of three schools was turned over to charter groups that expanded instruction by 90 minutes per day;District-run schools added enrichment offerings after school for kids, while teachers met to discuss and prepare daily plans;Outside data experts were brought in to guide ongoing changes;A new teacher compensation structure and contract was reached. There was broad new hiring of principals and assistant principals, and dismissal of low-performing teachers.Researchers at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) and Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) have studied the first round of academic achievement data to come out of Lawrence since the turnaround effort started. During a discussion Tuesday evening, they offered a first look at how the process is going. Compared with the state’s 48 other low-income-majority school districts, Lawrence students closed the achievement gap by two-thirds in 2012-2013.“There’s no question that in the first year of the turnaround, Lawrence’s achievement in math really jumped up by a substantial amount, whether you compare it to the state as a whole or to other low-income districts,” said Joshua Goodman, assistant professor of public policy at HKS and an HGSE faculty member, who was part of the research team.While the English language arts scores did not improve on average, those students who attended “acceleration academies” ― new weeklong intensive sessions held during school vacation breaks and taught by top teachers ― showed improvement both there and in math. “These gains that we see in math in particular are pretty widespread … so that’s somewhat comforting to us in the sense that it means these results are not being driven by one or two or three schools doing remarkable things,” said Goodman.The group will examine data from the current school year when it becomes available in early fall.“We’re trying to do something different here in Lawrence, and I think it really comes down to a school-by-school and student-by-student strategy,” said Seth Racine, chief redesign officer at Lawrence Public Schools. “We’re not trying to impose one model or one intervention on everybody.”“To me, this is very encouraging news,” said Paul Reville, the Francis Keppel Professor of Practice of Educational Policy and Administration at HGSE and the Massachusetts secretary of education from 2008 through 2012. Reville noted that given the country’s “terrible” track record trying to improve chronically underperforming schools, Lawrence is in the national spotlight as other districts and policymakers consider similar reforms.“Nowhere has a state done a good job in turning around the academic performance of a school district, and everyone has been very hopeful from the outset that we’re going to be the first state to break that logjam and to show that we can get promising educational results from an enlightened strategy” of school takeovers, he said.“We’ve got a lot more work to do if we’re going to make good on this promise of education reform, which is ‘we’re going to educate all students to a high level,’ and all means all.”last_img read more

first_imgAfter University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh died in 2015, the South Bend city council wanted to find a way to honor his memory, South Bend deputy director of public works Jitin Kain said. So it decided to install a statue of Hesburgh in the city.“ … The mayor’s office began speaking with the University about honoring his legacy, and the idea that came forward [for the statue] was the picture of him and Dr. King that has been used on campus a lot,” Kain said. “It’s very known. The idea was, ‘Can we make that into a life-size monument?’”The picture — replicated in the LaFortune Student Center — depicts Hesburgh holding hands with Martin Luther King Jr. at a rally in Chicago while they sing “We Shall Overcome,” according to a University press release.Fr. Hesburgh was known for his involvement with the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which he helped to engineer, former Notre Dame men’s basketball coach Digger Phelps said.“There were three men from the South and three men from the North — including Fr. Hesburgh — and they went up to the Land of Lakes in Wisconsin, where Notre Dame has a retreat place,” he said. “And that’s where after an afternoon of fishing, the six men … came up with ideas for the Civil Rights Act [and] took it to the White House to give to President Eisenhower.”Professor Emeritus of American studies and journalism Robert Schmuhl, author of “Fifty Years with Father Hesburgh: On and Off the Record,” said Hesburgh played a critical role in the Civil Rights movement.“Fr. Hesburgh was one of the original members of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission when it began its work in 1957,” he said in an email. “He served while four presidents were in the White House (from 1957 until 1972) and was named chairman of the Commission by Richard Nixon. That was a critical 15-year period in civil rights for this country, and Fr. Hesburgh was at the center of many of the actions and passions of this time.”Though Hesburgh tended to concentrate his personal involvement in national and international affairs rather than in South Bend, his work still impacted the local community, Schmuhl said.“Fr. Hesburgh viewed Notre Dame as a national — and international — university and as a result he tended to focus his attention and work on national and international affairs,” he said. “His appointments to various commissions and boards by American presidents and Popes reflected assignments of broad consequence with local implications. His service reverberated to encompass South Bend and the local area.”The sculpture of Hesburgh and King was designed by local sculptor Tuck Langland and funded by the African American Community Fund, the University of Notre Dame, the Community Foundation of St. Joseph County, Arthur J. Decio, Dorene and Jerry Hammes, Jerry H. Mowbray, Great Lakes Capital, Visit South Bend Mishawaka and the Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority (IHCDA), Kain said.“We knew we wanted to do more than just install the statue because we were also trying to activate the public plaza space,” Kain said. “So at that point we identified the need to fundraise a little more, to do some landscaping and the water feature which you see now in the plaza, tables and chairs and that part was done through a crowdfunding program called Patronicity.”Kain said the city raised approximately $20,000 through Patronicity, which the IHCDA then matched with a grant. Fundraising, along with choosing a location for the statue, were the aspects of the project which he said required the most planning.“But beyond that, you know, once the funding was in place, once the location was in place, we did have some challenges in getting contractors for the installation,” he said. “Because we have so much construction activity in our city, and this was a smaller project compared to some of the other work that’s happening in South Bend and on campus.”Kain said the statue was constructed in Leighton Plaza on South Main Street, in order to create “a space for gathering.”   “We often see people who are walking by the plaza will stop and take their picture with the statue, but will also sit in the plaza space,” he said. “So the plaza, Leighton Plaza, was very under-utilized. Once we placed the statue in there, it’s really become more of a vibrant public space.”Tags: City of South Bend, Fr. Ted, Martin Luther King Jr.last_img read more